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  • Smart cards: security risks

    Version 3 of the Java Card smart card specification, released in March 2008, overhauled the technical architecture of the smart card. The Connected Edition of the specification introduced a significantly enhanced execution environment and a new virtual machine. It includes new network-oriented features, support for web applications with new Servlet APIs, multi-threading and support for applets with extended and advanced capabilities. Such features add complexity to the smart card platform and the hosted applications, increasing the attack surface and introducing a multitude of vulnerabilities. The security models, testing and risk management programmes must cater for these susceptibilities. In this article we consider the new features of the Connected Edition and identify some of the security problems that developers need to be aware of.

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  • Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS)

    The O-TTPS is an open standard containing a set of guidelines that when properly adhered to have been shown to enhance the security of the global supply chain and the integrity of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) ICT products. It provides a set of guidelines, requirements, and recommendations that help assure against maliciously tainted and counterfeit products throughout the COTS ICT product life cycle encompassing the following phases: design, sourcing, build, fulfillment, distribution, sustainment, and disposal.

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      • The identity perimeter

        Successful businesses recognise the value of open communications within and beyond their organisations. However, achieving this means that the physical and virtual perimeters that had previously defined the reach of most organisations’ IT systems have disappeared. This report makes the case for the use of identity and advanced single-sign-on (SSO) to overcome many of the issues of providing open integration between businesses and their customers and partners. It should be of interest to all those in roles charged with the responsibility of providing secure access to online resources and to those who want to make the case for rolling out new online services, but have to overcome the security concerns of others in their organisation before they get the approval to do so.

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      • Enabling the secure use of RFID

        UHF radio frequency identification (RFID) promises vastly improved data collection and the analysis of physical objects from consumables to patients. Before its full potential can be exploited, it is critical that security surrounding its use is effectively implemented to ensure the data itself is not exploited

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      • Effective print management

        More businesses are now adopting a print management strategy to tackle rising print costs, enhance document security and reduce environmental impact. Intelligent print management features such as secure document release, rules-based printing and advanced reporting are helping businesses operate a cost-effective, secure and sustainable print environment.

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      • Effective print security for SMBs

        Businesses of all sizes have data of value, such as employee and customer information, which must be protected. While many businesses have secured their IT infrastructure to minimise unauthorised access to confidential or sensitive data, unsecured MFPs and networked printers remain a critical source of vulnerability.

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      • How to configure Mac OS X Server

        In the previous article in this series, we showed you how to secure a Mac using the functions built into its operating system, OS X. These functions range from simple password protection and patch management through to full-disk encryption. However, these are not the only security functions available. Indeed, OS X has a whole security and management infrastructure available for administrators called Managed Preferences, which can be managed most easily using OS X Server.

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      • FM, IT and Data Centres

        Are Facilities and IT data centre managers implacable enemies, or is it just a need for different priorities and emphases on work that seem to get in the way? Often, Quocirca finds that an organisation has one team – facilities management (FM) – looking after the physical facility of the data centre, with another – information technology (IT) – looking after the servers, storage and network equipment, along with the software running within it. This can lead to problems where priorities clash, or where a lack of common language or views of a problem can stop things from happening.

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      • Business Outcomes from Big Data

        Big data has not yet led to big outcomes. Despite all the hype, less than half of all employees find that corporate information helps them get their jobs done. The problem of getting the right information to the right people at the right time is getting worse with the growing number of information sources, uses, and users. Our previous research discussed how CIOs should help foster informed skepticism to boost the ability of employees to use big data for better decisions. This study discusses the CIO’s role in making big data attainable and useful.

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      • Making the case for the cloud in common use airport technology

        This report from Amadeus looks at the business case for cloud computing in airports.

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      • Computer Weekly Buyer’s Guide to data management

        In this 11-page buyer’s guide, Computer Weekly looks at the business benefits of data management tools and methods of analysing the stored data, along with some examples of how this data is being used to innovate.

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      • Computer Weekly Buyer's Guide to Big Data infrastructure

        In this 10-page buyer’s guide, Computer Weekly looks at the mindset and technology businesses need to analyse various forms of data, the low-cost solid state memory powering datastreams from social network feeds and the industrial internet and a revision of the traditional approach of matching back-end infrastructure to application requirements.

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      • Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS)

        The O-TTPS is an open standard containing a set of guidelines that when properly adhered to have been shown to enhance the security of the global supply chain and the integrity of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) ICT products. It provides a set of guidelines, requirements, and recommendations that help assure against maliciously tainted and counterfeit products throughout the COTS ICT product life cycle encompassing the following phases: design, sourcing, build, fulfillment, distribution, sustainment, and disposal.

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      • Special Report on Infosys

        This 6 page special report from Computer Weekly gives you the key facts on Infosys, its strategy, products and services and financial performance.

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      • Special Report on Adobe

        This special 7-page report from Computer Weekly, updated for 2014, analyses the challenges facing Adobe, its financial performance, the services and products it offers, its place in the IT market and its future strategy.

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      • The Human Face of Big Data: Data Driven

        On a small scale, the effects of software are benign. But at large companies, institutions, and agencies with hundreds of millions of users, something so apparently small as the choice of what should be a default setting has an immediate impact on the daily behavior patterns of a large percentage of the planet’s population.

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      • Governance in IT and Architecture - TOGAF

        The primary audiences for this Paper are business and IT managers who are responsible for the performance of operations. However, enterprise architects also play a key role in supporting IT governance, including architecture governance. Governance is defined as giving direction to activities. In this Paper, the authors focus on governance of the IT domain and its alignment to business. Governance is viewed as a mechanism that influences the internal logic and decision-making of organizations. The internal logic is defined as a compromise between practically conflicting parameters. The mechanism that has to deal with these conflicting parameters consists of decision domains, governance structure, social processes between individuals and groups, and controls to ensure the proper functioning of IT governance. In the context of IT governance, enterprise architecture can be considered as a means for coordination of decision-making related to IT and business. Furthermore, it is recognized that enterprise architecture in its own right also needs to be governed.

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      • Beyond Big Data – The New Information Economy

        Organisations are faced with an ever-increasing flow of different data types, including formal, database transactional information as well as less structured documents, voice and video. Within this mix of data types lies the intellectual property of a given organisation – and ensuring that it is in a format that can be easily mined and monetised is an on-going battle. Big data will be part of this, but other issues have to be taken into account. To uncover the true value hidden in the mass of data under the control of a given organisation requires a cohesive and coherent approach to information management. Quocirca believes that this needs a fully integrated system that acts on data streams, rather than taking actions on already stored data, and that there are multiple functions – such as data meta-tagging, deduplication, indexing, search and reporting – to ensure that the intellectual property assets can be optimally discovered and managed.

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      • CW Buyer’s Guide: Virtual desktops in the enterprise

        In this Computer Weekly buyer’s guide to virtual desktops, we investigate the latency and bandwidth issues that arise with thin client access, take a look at cloud economics in the datacentre, review Citrix’s XenDesktop 5 desktop virtualisation application, and see how virtualisation and business process optimisation work at the Co-operative

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      • Computer Weekly Buyer's Guide to infrastructure on demand

        Working out how to make infrastructure on demand work for your company is a challenge. In this 10-page buyer's guide, Computer Weekly looks at assessing the needs of your business, assess how a lack of standards is hindering progress, and assess Microsoft's Azure which aims to become an operating system for the cloud.

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      • CW Special Report on Symantec

        Packed with graphs and diagrams and tables, this independent analysis by Computer Weekly is essential reading for any organisation working with, or thinking of working with Symantec.

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      • Effective print management

        More businesses are now adopting a print management strategy to tackle rising print costs, enhance document security and reduce environmental impact. Intelligent print management features such as secure document release, rules-based printing and advanced reporting are helping businesses operate a cost-effective, secure and sustainable print environment.

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      • The Demise in Effectiveness of Signature and Heuristic Based Antivirus

        Today there is an urgent emphasis being placed by vendors on the need for antivirus to be installed on an increasing number of computing platforms used within organisations. The aim of this is to satisfy risk controls while also forming part of an organisation’s technical information security strategy. This market demand for antivirus has led to a number of security products which do little to actually protect the user, their data or the organisation.

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      • Security Visualisation

        This article is guideline of how to generate a visual representation of a given dataset and use in the evaluation of known security vulnerabilities. Although this example is based on the output of an automated vulnerability scanner (Nessus), the suggested information visualisation process can be applied to generate any kind of visualisation.

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      • Windows 8 Secrets

        Microsoft is introducing a major new release of its Windows operating system, Windows 8, and what better way for you to learn all the ins and outs than from two internationally recognized Windows experts and Microsoft insiders, authors Paul Thurrott and Rafael Rivera? They cut through the hype to get at useful information you'll not find anywhere else, including what role this new OS plays in a mobile and tablet world. This extract for Computer Weekly readers takes readers through the basics of installing Windows 8.

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      • Agile Project Management for Government

        This extract from Brian Wernham’s book agile Agile Project Management for Government shows how an agile approach can incrementally deliver large mission and safety critical technology solutions. It shows how the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) successfully developed a new, improved battlefield system in the space of 18 months by using the DSDM framework. The extract gives concrete examples of the concepts behind agile and shows how the DSDM framework was used to provide governance and a project management approach to ensure that things got done on time and within budget.

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      • Benefits Management: How to increase the business value of your IT projects

        Information systems and technology (IS/IT) are now essential components of the majority of businesses, allowing them to achieve greater efficiency of operations, increased agility in responding to changing market demands and the ability to develop innovative products and services. Equally, almost all public sector organizations could not deliver their services effectively and economically without the extensive use of IS/IT or ICT, as it is generally called in the public sector. However, despite the consensus about the strategic importance of IS and IT and the considerable investments that organizations continue to make in their purchase and implementation, the realization of benefits remains challenging. The need for a fresh approach: benefits management. This book extract explains the challenges facing IT departments and explains how benefits management can increase the value of IT projects to the business.

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      • FM, IT and Data Centres

        Are Facilities and IT data centre managers implacable enemies, or is it just a need for different priorities and emphases on work that seem to get in the way? Often, Quocirca finds that an organisation has one team – facilities management (FM) – looking after the physical facility of the data centre, with another – information technology (IT) – looking after the servers, storage and network equipment, along with the software running within it. This can lead to problems where priorities clash, or where a lack of common language or views of a problem can stop things from happening.

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      • Musings on datacentres

        2012 was a year when organisations had to face up to the fact that the basis of IT was beginning to change. Energy costs were rapidly escalating, new technical architectures, such as cloud computing, were coming to the fore and users were off doing their own things. The potential impact on the data centre was massive – and the following report pulls together articles written by Quocirca for SearchVirtualDataCentre (now part of ComputerWeekly) throughout 2012.

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      • The Single Unix Specification

        The Single UNIX Specification programming environment provides a broad-based functional set of interfaces to support the porting of existing UNIX applications and the development of new applications. The environment also supports a rich set of tools for application development.

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      • How to configure Mac OS X Server

        In the previous article in this series, we showed you how to secure a Mac using the functions built into its operating system, OS X. These functions range from simple password protection and patch management through to full-disk encryption. However, these are not the only security functions available. Indeed, OS X has a whole security and management infrastructure available for administrators called Managed Preferences, which can be managed most easily using OS X Server.

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      • CW Special report on Atos

        This 9 page special report, updated for 2014, gives you the facts on Atos, its strategy, products and services and financial performance.

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      • CW Special Report on CSC

        The acquisitive IT outsourcer has grown and evolved over the years, but the company is returning to its origins as it undergoes a huge restructuring exercise and moves into cloud services.

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      • CW Special Report on HP

        This 12 page special report from Computer Weekly, updated for 2013, gives you the facts on HP, its strategy, products and services and financial performance.

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      • Overview of the Open Group Security Forum

        The Security Forum is a membership group of security experts from both the customer and supply sides of industry, government, and academia, who share a common aim to raise confidence levels in IT business operations. We identify information security business requirements and develop standards and guides that respond to them. Our global scope looks across all industries towards what is common to all, benefiting IT suppliers and consumers alike. Our security strategy is focused on Security Architectures and Security Management – see our current list of projects, overleaf. We host quarterly Security Practitioners Conferences, where invited expert speakers address strategic issue within our interest areas.

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      • Computer Weekly Buyer's Guide to data security

        As the smartphone phenomenon has taken off, chief information security officers have needed to rethink what personal computing security really means –especially as the European Commission seeks to harmonise data protection law across EU member states.

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      • Integrating and monitoring business-to-business (B2B) value chains

        Increasing globalisation and diversity of both the suppliers and customers a given organisation has to deal with mean that supply chains are becoming ever more complex. Maintaining capabilities across broad functions requires systems that are well integrated, audited, secure and capable of being reported on at a granular level. Cloud-based approaches introduce new opportunities to gain access to advanced functionality, but also introduce issues around B2B integration for organisations.

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      • An Information Architecture Vision

        Information is the lifeblood of an enterprise in a knowledge-based economy, but most are awash in a sea of data unable to leverage their information holdings to gain competitive advantage and/or improve services. This “big data” challenge is projected to increase significantly over time and provide major opportunities to those willing to move their organizations from a “data rich” to an “information smart” environment. This White Paper from the Open Group assesses the “big data” problem, proposes business and architecture visions, and develops an Enterprise Information Planning and Architecture Model. The vision and model will assist companies to systematically develop their information holdings and related services to achieve business value. The paper is based upon global best practices in business and government and addresses the lifecycle management of all types of information holdings and services from transaction processing to advanced decision support to records and archiving. This report is targeted at Business Planners and Analysts as well as Enterprise and Information Architecture practitioners. It is also of interest to all other professionals engaged in data, information, and knowledge management.

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      • Open Group: FAIR -ISO/IEC 27005 Cookbook

        This document discusses the different purposes of the two standards, how to reconcile the two with regard to terminology and process, and combine the best elements of both to produce a consistent, repeatable risk management process.

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      • World-class enterprise architecture

        The world is changing at a pace faster than ever experienced. Several trends in demographics, technology, the environment, globalization, public attitudes, and political institutions are driving Government and Industry agendas as never before. In order to respond to the demands and needs of their stakeholders, organizations need to develop new and better ways of managing continuous change at ever-increasing pace to deliver significant value in a transparent manner. Organizations need an enterprise architecture function as an integral capability in order to support the requirement for continuous change. However, over the years, many organizations have attempted to set up enterprise architecture practices only to see them fail after a few years. These failures are due to several reasons, such as an inability to merge enterprise architecture processes with the other management processes within the organization – for example, demand management – or the lack of authority for enterprise architects – for example, when making strategic decisions or quality assuring programs and projects. In spite of these previous failures, organizations are again trying to set up enterprise architecture functions as they have found that no other pragmatic alternatives exist.

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      • Business Continuity Management Systems

        This downloadable extract focuses on the practical elements of business continuity management and considers them from a management system perspective: Where should the emphasis be when it comes to fitting your Business Continuity Management (BCM) arrangements into a management system? The chapter uses six phases of the BCM lifecycle as a focal point and offer top tips for you to consider when developing your Business Continuity Management System (BCMS).

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      • Practical Data Migration: PDMv2

        In this chapter from the second edition of his book, Morris outlines PDMv2 and show how it overcomes common data migration problems by using a set of integrated modules that cover the whole scope of a data migration from project start-up to legacy decommissioning and beyond. The chapter also gives a brief overview of the types of software technology available to support data migration.

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      • Computer Weekly Buyer's Guide to Retail IT

        Is the demand to keep up with the latest IT trends leaving the back-office functions of security and supply chain management and data analysis to wither on the vine? Our eight-page Buyer’s Guide to Retail IT assesses the implications and challenges facing CIOs and senior IT professionals.

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      • Computer Weekly Buyer's Guide to Government IT

        While the pace of the move to open source in the public sector has been slow so far, a number of factors are converging to determine the blueprint for its future use in government IT. These include the Cabinet Office’s consultation to define the use of open standards in government and G-Cloud, which is supposed to make it easier and less costly to become a government supplier. This guide takes you through the initiatives under way and reveals how they could benefit your business.

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      • Encryption in the cloud

        This article in our Royal Holloway Information Security series assesses challenges of providing effective encryption to data stored in the cloud.

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      • Secure internet routing

        This article in our Royal Holloway Information Security series assesses whether Resource Public Key Infrastructure can provide a framework for effective security.

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      • Smart cards: security risks

        Version 3 of the Java Card smart card specification, released in March 2008, overhauled the technical architecture of the smart card. The Connected Edition of the specification introduced a significantly enhanced execution environment and a new virtual machine. It includes new network-oriented features, support for web applications with new Servlet APIs, multi-threading and support for applets with extended and advanced capabilities. Such features add complexity to the smart card platform and the hosted applications, increasing the attack surface and introducing a multitude of vulnerabilities. The security models, testing and risk management programmes must cater for these susceptibilities. In this article we consider the new features of the Connected Edition and identify some of the security problems that developers need to be aware of.

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      • CW Special Report on Oracle

        This special repor gives an independent view of the challenges facing Oracle, its financial performance, the services it offers, its place in the IT market and its future strategy

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      • Open Group technical document: IT Specialist Certification Accreditation Policy

        Clearly “book learning” is a critical first step to becoming effective at anything. But the effectiveness, potential, and the degree and value of contribution rise to a new level as relevant skills and experience are gained in a topical area. It is clearly important to “know” a subject, but it is more valuable to have applied that knowledge. It is for this reason that The Open Group IT Specialist Certification (ITSC) program is based on an assessment of people skills, technical skills, and experience, not just tests of knowledge.

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      • Maximising automation and the industrialisation of IT

        There is a huge amount of human expertise and time being wasted by the majority of IT operations teams. Increased automation is one of the most effective ways to overcome this problem. Only when the tools and services to achieve this are in place can the industrialisation of IT management processes begin. IT operations teams will then have more time to focus on transformation, innovation and deployment of new applications in the interests of the businesses they serve.

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      • The Human Face of Big Data: Pulse of the Planet

        After more than 50 years, the Computer Age as we’ve known it is ending. And what will replace it—perhaps we’ll call it the Informatics Age—will be a kind of Copernican Revolution in knowledge. That is, humans will no longer be the center of the data solar system, with all of the billions of devices orbiting around us, but will rather become just another player, another node, in an increasingly autonomous data universe.

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      • Finance for IT decision makers: Making business cases

        This extract from Michael Blackstaff’s book, Finance for IT decision makers, teaches you how to make business and financial cases for IT projects. After reading this article you will be able to: • explain why organisations should attempt to quantify both the benefits and costs of a proposed investment; • explain the difference between a financial case and a business case; • describe some ways in which it may be possible to quantify ‘intangible benefits’; • list four kinds of financial benefit; • describe the difference between cash flow and profit, and explain why cash flow is usually regarded as the fundamental basis for investment decision-making.

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      • How to embed innovation in the corporate culture

        Innovation often features high on CIOs’ agendas because it is recognized as being an important means by which information systems and technology can contribute positively to the evolution and performance of the business. However, in practice the execution often falls short of the ambition. Reasons for this range from the mundane, such as there being insufficient time or capacity to devote to it, to the more fundamental, such as organizational or cultural barriers, or insufficiently defined processes and governance for capturing ideas and seeing them through to fruition.

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      • The Open Group: Cloud buyers’ requirements questionnaire

        This White Paper describes a questionnaire that will help you identify your requirements for Cloud computing in a structured way, so that you can more easily reach the best solution. It contains questions about your enterprise – not about the products and services that you might be considering. It is put forward for discussion, with the intention that this discussion, and validation in the field, will result in a practical tool for use by enterprises.

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      • Open Information Security Management Maturity Model (O-ISM3)

        Organizations in different business sectors and countries have different business requirements and risk tolerances. The O-ISM3 framework helps information Security Managers to evaluate their own operating environment and to plan their security management processes so they are consistent with and cost-effective for their organization’s business objectives.

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      • The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF™ 9) and the US DoD

        This White Paper provides a comparative analysis of the two frameworks that describes where DoDAF products can be employed throughout the TOGAF ADM phases to develop a visual, integrated model of an architecture. The intended audience is the DoD architect who can benefit from a formal methodology to guide architecture efforts and result in a quality architecture description in a DoD-compliant format, and the TOGAF architect who can benefit by a formal set of defined models to capture output for each of the ADM phases. This document provides the architect with a map of the specific DoDAF 2.0 model that should be produced or consumed in a specific phase of TOGAF 9 with enough context to understand the fundamental concepts of both DoDAF and TOGAF.

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      • Information security for SMEs

        In this article, from our Royal Holloway Security Thesis series, we propose a simplified implementation approach for an information security management system (ISMS) for SMEs.

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      • Computer Weekly Buyer's Guide to IT for SMEs

        In the face of ongoing economic uncertainty businesses are coming under increasing pressure to do more with less. The easy answer is to lengthen refresh cycles and sweat assets, but this six-page buyer’s guide looks at more innovative methods that small to medium-sized enterprises can use to make the most economic and rewarding buying decisions for their business and extract the most value from their IT investments.

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      • Enabling the secure use of RFID

        UHF radio frequency identification (RFID) promises vastly improved data collection and the analysis of physical objects from consumables to patients. Before its full potential can be exploited, it is critical that security surrounding its use is effectively implemented to ensure the data itself is not exploited

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      • Computer Weekly's Buyer’s guide to Software-defined networking

        In this 11-page buyer’s guide, Computer Weekly looks at how SDN can give IT administrators greater control over the network infrastructure and make it a far more flexible and agile part of the business.

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      • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

        The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

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      • Calculating Cloud ROI : From the Customer Perspective

        Marketing hype claims that cloud computing can help any enterprise meet most IT service needs at a lower total cost of ownership (TCO) and higher return on investment (ROI). However, the promise of the cloud requiring minimal capital investment and the subjectivity of some cloud benefits have created some confusion among IT professionals trying to determine the benefits of adopting cloud services. Calculating ROI for cloud services requires some up-front work to understand business requirements, organizational, maturity, control considerations and regulatory requirements and to quantify benefits and costs associated with the cloud model that the enterprise has selected. Strategic benefits could be more subjective and may require additional analysis to measure their financial impact over the investment. To determine whether the cloud is a viable option, it is necessary to separate the hype from reality. Calculating ROI does not need to be complex because it is only an estimate to support investment decisions; however, it must be accurate and based on realistic expectations

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      • The Cloud Risk Framework

        Companies that are considering moving to a cloud computing model need effective metrics and analytics to help guide their decisions. This cloud framework is designed to help assess the financial risks of moving to the cloud. This paper is aimed at private or public entities with more than 500 employees, and considers risk from their perspective

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      • Underexposed risks of public Wi-Fi hotspots

        All is not always as it appears when users access public Wi-Fi networks via seemingly authentic and trustworthy providers. This article, in our Royal Holloway Information Security Thesis series seeks to raise awareness of the underexposed risks for identity and data theft by exploring the status quo and potential developments for minimising those risks.

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      • Sleeping Android: the danger of dormant permissions

        A weakness in the permissions architecture of the Android platform means that apps could gain access to functionality without a user’s knowledge or consent, leaving them open to exploitation or abuse by attackers. Changes to the way the Android platform authorises permission requests could compromise the security of unwary users.

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      • Supporting requirements management in TOGAF

        Requirements management is an important activity in the process of designing and managing enterprise architectures. Requirements from various stakeholders form the basis for any change to an organization and its architecture. The quality of these requirements, the extent to which they are realized, and the ease with which they can be changed, determine the quality of any enterprise architecture. Nonetheless, many enterprise architecture modeling techniques focus on what the enterprise should do by representing “as-is” and “to-be” architectures in terms of informational, behavioral, and structural models at the different architectural layers (e.g., business, application, and technical infrastructure). Little or no attention is paid to represent (explicitly) the reasons; i.e., the why, behind the to-be architectures in terms of motivations, rationale, goals, and requirements.

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      • The Open Group Service Integration Maturity Model (OSIMM) Version 2

        Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is an architectural style that supports service orientation. A service is a business task with an externalized service description that often represents a contract between a provider and a consumer. As organizations adopt SOA and the use of services as the fundamental structuring element of their architecture, they increasingly encounter the need to assess where they are in their migration path and how best to achieve the expected benefit derived from integrating and investing in greater levels of SOA maturity.

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      • IT Priorities 2014 Special Report

        Computer Weekly editors draw on their expertise to explain the main technology trends for IT in the UK and across Europe in 2014.

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      • Negotiating cloud contracts

        This article, drawing on sources including interviews with cloud computing providers, users and other market actors, is the first in-depth research into how cloud contracts are negotiated. In particular, we have focused on instances where users have requested changes to providers’ standard terms, and the extent to which providers agreed to those changes. We have found that the terms that generated the most negotiation were provider liability, service level agreements, data protection and security, termination rights, unilateral amendments to service features, and intellectual property rights.

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      • Gartner: Best practices for I&O for cloud-readiness

        Cloud computing could end up being a hindrance rather than a help to an enterprise if not planned and implemented properly. In many infrastructure and operations (I&O) teams, it can be observed that previous failures are repeating themselves over and over. Very few organisations are mature enough in terms of people and process capabilities to be able to take cues from past failures and prepare themselves for the foreseeable as well as the unforeseen future.

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      • CW Buyers Guide: Green IT

        With IT such a large energy drain for many organisations, firms that cut IT power consumption will reap big benefits. Going green means that computer room air conditioners and chillers are no longer required in the datacentre, potentially slashing energy costs by up to 50% and dramatically lowering the facility’s carbon footprint.

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      • The Open Group: Cloud buyers’ decision tree

        This White Paper describes a Decision Tree that could be used to help you discover where Cloud opportunities and solutions might fit in your organization. It is put forward for discussion, with the intention that this discussion, and validation in the field, will result in a practical tool for use by enterprises. Your business situation is either a problem or an opportunity for which you are seeking a solution that includes IT enablement. This Tree presupposes that the current and/or future state of the IT resources for your business situation does and/or will not meet requirements. If you are a Cloud seller, then use this Decision Tree in reverse to determine for which business situations your proposed offering would be a good fit.

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      • Effective print security for SMBs

        Businesses of all sizes have data of value, such as employee and customer information, which must be protected. While many businesses have secured their IT infrastructure to minimise unauthorised access to confidential or sensitive data, unsecured MFPs and networked printers remain a critical source of vulnerability.

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      • Building return on investment from cloud computing

        Cloud Computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction [1]. This enables users to avoid over-provisioning and under-provisioning, to improve cost, revenue, and margin, and to provide new business services based on new ways of operating.

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      • CW Special Report on CA Technologies

        This 9 page special independent report from Computer Weekly, updated for 2014, gives you the facts on CA, its strategy, products and services and financial performance.

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      • CW Buyer's Guide To Finance and Insurance

        In this 11-page buyer’s guide, Computer Weekly looks at mitigating the risks of data breaches with liability insurance; the variety of ways to finance your organisation’s technology platforms in a world of rapid change; and funding software investment for the economic recovery while budgets remain tight.

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      • The Banking Industry Architecture Network and TOGAF

        Financial institutions are facing significant changes of the environment in which they operate. For example, the financial crisis, changing customer behavior, increased risk awareness, focus on cost reduction, and the entrance of new financial players in the market-place have structurally changed the financial industry. Not only the operations, but also the supporting IT required a challenging transformational change. Given the close inter-dependency of operations and IT in financial institutions, a carefully planned and guided integrated approach to change is required. Enterprise architecture is key to enabling such change initiatives.

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      • TOGAF® and SABSA® Integration

        This paper from the Open Group, documents an approach to enhance the TOGAF enterprise architecture methodology with the SABSA security architecture approach to create one holistic architecture methodology.

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