Photos: Hardware Hoarders - Your old computers (PART 1)

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Tangerine dream: Chris Bores 1977 Tangerine Microtan 65

Tangerine dream: Chris Bores 1977 Tangerine Microtan 65

Chris says the Tangerine "had an NMOS 6502 running at 750 kHz, and 1 kbytes RAM. It was sold as a kit - a circuit board and components that you soldered together. The metal case was an optional extra, and the 'full QWERTY' keyboard an amazing luxury that I saved up to buy the following year - it cost £75 at the time. The original kit came with a hexadecimal keypad, which I still have but have mislaid. There was no storage facility, you typed in the hex programmes by hand. There was a simple monitor (called the 'bug') on a 1 K EPROM. I later bought an expansion board that contained a simple hex debugger and a utility that let you use a digital-to-analogue converter to output modulated audio so that you could store data to a tape recorder - at rates up to 2400 baud. The display was 32x16 characters, but you could program simple graphics. The longest program I ever typed in (not my own) was for Space Invaders: it took about two hours typing it in (my girlfriend used to read out the hex codes as I typ

 

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We're inviting Computer Weekly readers to send us photos and videos of the oldest IT equipment they've held on to, and to share their excuses for hoarding it.

We had around 70 photos last year!

See our other hoarders:

 

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Also, if you've enjoyed this, you might also enjoy our very own

Retro computer games photo gallery.

If you have some kit you  want to show off, send  your pictures to faisal.alani@rbi.co.uk.

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