Opinion

Security Think Tank: Context, the 5 Ws and H of security

The world moves at an ever-changing speed and businesses and marketing activities are no stranger to that. We live in a world that is focused on tailoring messages and customising experiences for the individual and geomarketing initiatives are in today's marketing department's agendas.

The ability to geolocate someone and use of different variables such as time, position and the connected device used help shape the way we work, live and play with the universe surrounding us. Geolocation brings benefits to every party in terms of personalisation, reach, relevant messaging and so on, but it also opens the doors to challenges such as privacy, threats and the whole governance perspective.

Business must understand that they will be dealing with what is known as PII (personal identifiable information) and need to present the right questions, to the right people, at the right time. Considerations such as the time for which the information is kept and the purpose of the information in the first place are of great importance to how businesses approach context-aware security technologies and their benefits.

This is the era of context-aware computing when it is not only important WHO you are, but also WHAT you're requesting, HOW you're connected, WHEN you're requesting information and WHERE to and from. These five simple/basic questions will lead us to the sixth one, probably the most important for businesses: the WHY.

With that in mind, companies can present different approaches to different people, through different channels. We live in the era of the third platform, that combines cloud, social media and mobility and, definitively, geolocation plays an instrumental role in these three areas and that new platform.

Ramsés Gallego is the international vice president of ISACA

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This was first published in March 2013

 

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