• Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS)

    The O-TTPS is an open standard containing a set of guidelines that when properly adhered to have been shown to enhance the security of the global s...

  • The identity perimeter

    Successful businesses recognise the value of open communications within and beyond their organisations. However, achieving this means that the phys...

  • Enabling the secure use of RFID

    UHF radio frequency identification (RFID) promises vastly improved data collection and the analysis of physical objects from consumables to patient...

  • Effective print management

    More businesses are now adopting a print management strategy to tackle rising print costs, enhance document security and reduce environmental impac...

IT management

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  • Effective print security for SMBs

    Businesses of all sizes have data of value, such as employee and customer information, which must be protected. While many businesses have secured their IT infrastructure to minimise unauthorised access to confidential or sensitive data, unsecured MFPs and networked printers remain a critical source of vulnerability.

  • Atos revenue slips but UK growth up 3.7%

    Revenue of Atos dipped 1.9% in the first half of 2014 because of slowdown in IT orders in Europe, but UK growth was up

  • Sleeping Android: the danger of dormant permissions

    A weakness in the permissions architecture of the Android platform means that apps could gain access to functionality without a user’s knowledge or consent, leaving them open to exploitation or abuse by attackers. Changes to the way the Android platform authorises permission requests could compromise the security of unwary users.

  • Negotiating cloud contracts

    This article, drawing on sources including interviews with cloud computing providers, users and other market actors, is the first in-depth research into how cloud contracts are negotiated. In particular, we have focused on instances where users have requested changes to providers’ standard terms, and the extent to which providers agreed to those changes. We have found that the terms that generated the most negotiation were provider liability, service level agreements, data protection and security, termination rights, unilateral amendments to service features, and intellectual property rights.

  • CWwomen: Come as you are, do what you love – Microsoft

    In this video from Computer Weekly’s Women in IT event, Dr Nicola Hodson talks about inclusion in the workplace, the current skills crisis in the technology industry, and recruiting skills for a more diverse base into enterprises.

  • The next frontier for managed print services

    The managed print services (MPS) market has matured since many organisations inked their first deal. Organisations moving beyond first generation engagements have often reached the end of their cost-cutting phase and are now looking for innovation to drive more business value. MPS is extending beyond the enterprise print environment to address requirements of mobile and remote workers, as well as encompass IT infrastructure and business process outsourcing. By leveraging the synergies of managed print services (MPS), business process services (BPS) and IT services (ITS) through a single provider, enterprises can drive business process innovation that pays continuous dividends.

  • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

    The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

  • The Human Face of Big Data: Data Driven

    On a small scale, the effects of software are benign. But at large companies, institutions, and agencies with hundreds of millions of users, something so apparently small as the choice of what should be a default setting has an immediate impact on the daily behavior patterns of a large percentage of the planet’s population.

  • The Human Face of Big Data: Pulse of the Planet

    After more than 50 years, the Computer Age as we’ve known it is ending. And what will replace it—perhaps we’ll call it the Informatics Age—will be a kind of Copernican Revolution in knowledge. That is, humans will no longer be the center of the data solar system, with all of the billions of devices orbiting around us, but will rather become just another player, another node, in an increasingly autonomous data universe.

  • Finance for IT decision makers: Making business cases

    This extract from Michael Blackstaff’s book, Finance for IT decision makers, teaches you how to make business and financial cases for IT projects. After reading this article you will be able to: • explain why organisations should attempt to quantify both the benefits and costs of a proposed investment; • explain the difference between a financial case and a business case; • describe some ways in which it may be possible to quantify ‘intangible benefits’; • list four kinds of financial benefit; • describe the difference between cash flow and profit, and explain why cash flow is usually regarded as the fundamental basis for investment decision-making.

  • VIEW MORE ON : Strategy
  • Atos revenue slips but UK growth up 3.7%

    Revenue of Atos dipped 1.9% in the first half of 2014 because of slowdown in IT orders in Europe, but UK growth was up

  • Negotiating cloud contracts

    This article, drawing on sources including interviews with cloud computing providers, users and other market actors, is the first in-depth research into how cloud contracts are negotiated. In particular, we have focused on instances where users have requested changes to providers’ standard terms, and the extent to which providers agreed to those changes. We have found that the terms that generated the most negotiation were provider liability, service level agreements, data protection and security, termination rights, unilateral amendments to service features, and intellectual property rights.

  • Finance for IT decision makers: Making business cases

    This extract from Michael Blackstaff’s book, Finance for IT decision makers, teaches you how to make business and financial cases for IT projects. After reading this article you will be able to: • explain why organisations should attempt to quantify both the benefits and costs of a proposed investment; • explain the difference between a financial case and a business case; • describe some ways in which it may be possible to quantify ‘intangible benefits’; • list four kinds of financial benefit; • describe the difference between cash flow and profit, and explain why cash flow is usually regarded as the fundamental basis for investment decision-making.

  • Benefits Management: How to increase the business value of your IT projects

    Information systems and technology (IS/IT) are now essential components of the majority of businesses, allowing them to achieve greater efficiency of operations, increased agility in responding to changing market demands and the ability to develop innovative products and services. Equally, almost all public sector organizations could not deliver their services effectively and economically without the extensive use of IS/IT or ICT, as it is generally called in the public sector. However, despite the consensus about the strategic importance of IS and IT and the considerable investments that organizations continue to make in their purchase and implementation, the realization of benefits remains challenging. The need for a fresh approach: benefits management. This book extract explains the challenges facing IT departments and explains how benefits management can increase the value of IT projects to the business.

  • Technology value matrix: Human Resources solutions

    Most small and medium businesses (SMBs) and all large enterprises employ human resources (HR) functionality to manage their employees. Even though many vendors offer HR solutions, these solutions may require integration with other HR software or with enterprise resource planning (ERP) to cover the functionality companies need. Some vendors differentiate themselves from their competitors by providing HR solutions built on new technologies, often times delivered in the cloud, and which can also be accessed on mobile devices.

  • The Open Group: Cloud buyers’ requirements questionnaire

    This White Paper describes a questionnaire that will help you identify your requirements for Cloud computing in a structured way, so that you can more easily reach the best solution. It contains questions about your enterprise – not about the products and services that you might be considering. It is put forward for discussion, with the intention that this discussion, and validation in the field, will result in a practical tool for use by enterprises.

  • Open Information Security Management Maturity Model (O-ISM3)

    Organizations in different business sectors and countries have different business requirements and risk tolerances. The O-ISM3 framework helps information Security Managers to evaluate their own operating environment and to plan their security management processes so they are consistent with and cost-effective for their organization’s business objectives.

  • The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF™ 9) and the US DoD

    This White Paper provides a comparative analysis of the two frameworks that describes where DoDAF products can be employed throughout the TOGAF ADM phases to develop a visual, integrated model of an architecture. The intended audience is the DoD architect who can benefit from a formal methodology to guide architecture efforts and result in a quality architecture description in a DoD-compliant format, and the TOGAF architect who can benefit by a formal set of defined models to capture output for each of the ADM phases. This document provides the architect with a map of the specific DoDAF 2.0 model that should be produced or consumed in a specific phase of TOGAF 9 with enough context to understand the fundamental concepts of both DoDAF and TOGAF.

  • Governance in IT and Architecture - TOGAF

    The primary audiences for this Paper are business and IT managers who are responsible for the performance of operations. However, enterprise architects also play a key role in supporting IT governance, including architecture governance. Governance is defined as giving direction to activities. In this Paper, the authors focus on governance of the IT domain and its alignment to business. Governance is viewed as a mechanism that influences the internal logic and decision-making of organizations. The internal logic is defined as a compromise between practically conflicting parameters. The mechanism that has to deal with these conflicting parameters consists of decision domains, governance structure, social processes between individuals and groups, and controls to ensure the proper functioning of IT governance. In the context of IT governance, enterprise architecture can be considered as a means for coordination of decision-making related to IT and business. Furthermore, it is recognized that enterprise architecture in its own right also needs to be governed.

  • IT Specialist Certification (ITSC) accreditation requirements

    The Open Group IT Specialist Certification Program (the Program) is designed to validate the existence of those qualities and skills in a professional that enable the effective development, implementation, and operation of IT solutions. The Program is skills and experience-based and goes beyond validating the mastery of any specific knowledge base. The Program includes a framework for accreditation of third parties to establish IT Specialist certification programs affiliated to The Open Group. The framework of accreditation and certification is specifically intended to standardize the process and criteria for IT Specialist professional certification and establish a foundation for the required skills and experience necessary to achieve such a distinction. The Program has been designed to be flexible and extensible so that the framework may be adopted by any industry, country, or organization.

  • VIEW MORE ON : Governance
  • Smartself-service – a guide for buyers

    When looking for a self-service knowledge solution, it can be hard to distinguish between vendors. Most make very similar claims about the capabilities and benefits of their product. To make an informed choice, it is necessary to go beyond marketing rhetoric and assess the specifics of each vendor’s offering. Does the vendor’s feature set support the way in which you envisage implementing self-service? Can the vendor help to deliver an ideal customer experience? Just as important, is the vendor someone with whom you can see yourself happily working?

  • Negotiating cloud contracts

    This article, drawing on sources including interviews with cloud computing providers, users and other market actors, is the first in-depth research into how cloud contracts are negotiated. In particular, we have focused on instances where users have requested changes to providers’ standard terms, and the extent to which providers agreed to those changes. We have found that the terms that generated the most negotiation were provider liability, service level agreements, data protection and security, termination rights, unilateral amendments to service features, and intellectual property rights.

  • Maximising automation and the industrialisation of IT

    There is a huge amount of human expertise and time being wasted by the majority of IT operations teams. Increased automation is one of the most effective ways to overcome this problem. Only when the tools and services to achieve this are in place can the industrialisation of IT management processes begin. IT operations teams will then have more time to focus on transformation, innovation and deployment of new applications in the interests of the businesses they serve.

  • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

    The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

  • The Human Face of Big Data: Data Driven

    On a small scale, the effects of software are benign. But at large companies, institutions, and agencies with hundreds of millions of users, something so apparently small as the choice of what should be a default setting has an immediate impact on the daily behavior patterns of a large percentage of the planet’s population.

  • The Human Face of Big Data: Pulse of the Planet

    After more than 50 years, the Computer Age as we’ve known it is ending. And what will replace it—perhaps we’ll call it the Informatics Age—will be a kind of Copernican Revolution in knowledge. That is, humans will no longer be the center of the data solar system, with all of the billions of devices orbiting around us, but will rather become just another player, another node, in an increasingly autonomous data universe.

  • Finance for IT decision makers: Making business cases

    This extract from Michael Blackstaff’s book, Finance for IT decision makers, teaches you how to make business and financial cases for IT projects. After reading this article you will be able to: • explain why organisations should attempt to quantify both the benefits and costs of a proposed investment; • explain the difference between a financial case and a business case; • describe some ways in which it may be possible to quantify ‘intangible benefits’; • list four kinds of financial benefit; • describe the difference between cash flow and profit, and explain why cash flow is usually regarded as the fundamental basis for investment decision-making.

  • Business Outcomes from Big Data

    Big data has not yet led to big outcomes. Despite all the hype, less than half of all employees find that corporate information helps them get their jobs done. The problem of getting the right information to the right people at the right time is getting worse with the growing number of information sources, uses, and users. Our previous research discussed how CIOs should help foster informed skepticism to boost the ability of employees to use big data for better decisions. This study discusses the CIO’s role in making big data attainable and useful.

  • Agile Project Management for Government

    This extract from Brian Wernham’s book agile Agile Project Management for Government shows how an agile approach can incrementally deliver large mission and safety critical technology solutions. It shows how the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) successfully developed a new, improved battlefield system in the space of 18 months by using the DSDM framework. The extract gives concrete examples of the concepts behind agile and shows how the DSDM framework was used to provide governance and a project management approach to ensure that things got done on time and within budget.

  • Benefits Management: How to increase the business value of your IT projects

    Information systems and technology (IS/IT) are now essential components of the majority of businesses, allowing them to achieve greater efficiency of operations, increased agility in responding to changing market demands and the ability to develop innovative products and services. Equally, almost all public sector organizations could not deliver their services effectively and economically without the extensive use of IS/IT or ICT, as it is generally called in the public sector. However, despite the consensus about the strategic importance of IS and IT and the considerable investments that organizations continue to make in their purchase and implementation, the realization of benefits remains challenging. The need for a fresh approach: benefits management. This book extract explains the challenges facing IT departments and explains how benefits management can increase the value of IT projects to the business.

  • VIEW MORE ON : IT leadership & CW500
  • CWwomen: Come as you are, do what you love – Microsoft

    In this video from Computer Weekly’s Women in IT event, Dr Nicola Hodson talks about inclusion in the workplace, the current skills crisis in the technology industry, and recruiting skills for a more diverse base into enterprises.

  • Cloudwatt deploys SDN to orchestrate public cloud service

    Cloud firm Cloudwatt integrates Juniper OpenContrail SDN, NFV solution to support its public cloud environment

  • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

    The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

  • The Human Face of Big Data: Data Driven

    On a small scale, the effects of software are benign. But at large companies, institutions, and agencies with hundreds of millions of users, something so apparently small as the choice of what should be a default setting has an immediate impact on the daily behavior patterns of a large percentage of the planet’s population.

  • Finance for IT decision makers: Making business cases

    This extract from Michael Blackstaff’s book, Finance for IT decision makers, teaches you how to make business and financial cases for IT projects. After reading this article you will be able to: • explain why organisations should attempt to quantify both the benefits and costs of a proposed investment; • explain the difference between a financial case and a business case; • describe some ways in which it may be possible to quantify ‘intangible benefits’; • list four kinds of financial benefit; • describe the difference between cash flow and profit, and explain why cash flow is usually regarded as the fundamental basis for investment decision-making.

  • Dr Who visual effects studio builds desktop as a service for graphics

    Jellyfish Pictures, the visual effects and animation studio behind Dr Who and the Line of Duty link has developed a DaaS for GPU

  • IT Project Management: Guide to estimating timescales and resources.

    This book extract explains how to estimate the timescales and effort required for IT projects.

  • Another CIO leaves Royal Bank of Scotland

    Scott Marcar, CIO of Royal Bank of Scotland’s Markets division, quit this week, according to sources

  • Stories That Move Mountains: Improve your presentation skills

    Anyone who has a business role to play in influencing others, needs to make their presentation stand out from the crowd and this extract from Stories That Move Mountains, published by Wiley, promises to help the reader do just that. Authored by three enterprise experts at Microsoft, Stories That Move Mountains, explains to readers how to use a process called CAST (Content, Audience, Story and Tell) to create effective stories and visualisations - known as ‘Story Mapping’ – and deliver persuasive presentations.

  • TfL wastes millions on telecoms, says IIPAG watchdog

    Watchdog IIPAG criticises Transport for London (TfL) for its inefficient and fragmented telecoms contracts

  • VIEW MORE ON : Project management
  • Atos revenue slips but UK growth up 3.7%

    Revenue of Atos dipped 1.9% in the first half of 2014 because of slowdown in IT orders in Europe, but UK growth was up

  • Smartself-service – a guide for buyers

    When looking for a self-service knowledge solution, it can be hard to distinguish between vendors. Most make very similar claims about the capabilities and benefits of their product. To make an informed choice, it is necessary to go beyond marketing rhetoric and assess the specifics of each vendor’s offering. Does the vendor’s feature set support the way in which you envisage implementing self-service? Can the vendor help to deliver an ideal customer experience? Just as important, is the vendor someone with whom you can see yourself happily working?

  • Negotiating cloud contracts

    This article, drawing on sources including interviews with cloud computing providers, users and other market actors, is the first in-depth research into how cloud contracts are negotiated. In particular, we have focused on instances where users have requested changes to providers’ standard terms, and the extent to which providers agreed to those changes. We have found that the terms that generated the most negotiation were provider liability, service level agreements, data protection and security, termination rights, unilateral amendments to service features, and intellectual property rights.

  • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

    The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

  • Oracle in-memory option creates licensing pain and audit risk

    A former Oracle employee has highlighted a major issue in the way the new Oracle Database 12c Release 12.1.0.2 is licensed

  • Integrating and monitoring business-to-business (B2B) value chains

    Increasing globalisation and diversity of both the suppliers and customers a given organisation has to deal with mean that supply chains are becoming ever more complex. Maintaining capabilities across broad functions requires systems that are well integrated, audited, secure and capable of being reported on at a granular level. Cloud-based approaches introduce new opportunities to gain access to advanced functionality, but also introduce issues around B2B integration for organisations.

  • Bank of America: When software relationships turn sour

    Tibco has filed a lawsuit alleging the Merrill Lynch division of Bank of America illegally used $300m of its software for a major IT project

  • G-Cloud supplier blames lack of stability for poor government spend

    G-Cloud supplier Databarracks calls for more stability and continuity, warning that lack of guidance and clarity is putting off local government

  • How to improve your communication with your boss

    Effective communication between boss and subordinate is essential. If you and your boss are not communicating effectively, you will be wasting a lot of time attempting to deliver what you ‘think’ your boss wants, inevitably to find our assumptions are fundamentally flawed.

  • Stories That Move Mountains: Improve your presentation skills

    Anyone who has a business role to play in influencing others, needs to make their presentation stand out from the crowd and this extract from Stories That Move Mountains, published by Wiley, promises to help the reader do just that. Authored by three enterprise experts at Microsoft, Stories That Move Mountains, explains to readers how to use a process called CAST (Content, Audience, Story and Tell) to create effective stories and visualisations - known as ‘Story Mapping’ – and deliver persuasive presentations.

  • VIEW MORE ON : Supplier management
  • How to configure Mac OS X Server

    In the previous article in this series, we showed you how to secure a Mac using the functions built into its operating system, OS X. These functions range from simple password protection and patch management through to full-disk encryption. However, these are not the only security functions available. Indeed, OS X has a whole security and management infrastructure available for administrators called Managed Preferences, which can be managed most easily using OS X Server.

  • Atos revenue slips but UK growth up 3.7%

    Revenue of Atos dipped 1.9% in the first half of 2014 because of slowdown in IT orders in Europe, but UK growth was up

  • FM, IT and Data Centres

    Are Facilities and IT data centre managers implacable enemies, or is it just a need for different priorities and emphases on work that seem to get in the way? Often, Quocirca finds that an organisation has one team – facilities management (FM) – looking after the physical facility of the data centre, with another – information technology (IT) – looking after the servers, storage and network equipment, along with the software running within it. This can lead to problems where priorities clash, or where a lack of common language or views of a problem can stop things from happening.

  • Musings on datacentres

    2012 was a year when organisations had to face up to the fact that the basis of IT was beginning to change. Energy costs were rapidly escalating, new technical architectures, such as cloud computing, were coming to the fore and users were off doing their own things. The potential impact on the data centre was massive – and the following report pulls together articles written by Quocirca for SearchVirtualDataCentre (now part of ComputerWeekly) throughout 2012.

  • Virtualization Security: Protecting Virtualized Environments

    Hardening the hypervisor should really be viewed as a standard practice, much as it should be for enterprise servers of any importance. There are an incredible number of configuration options for the major platforms (ESXi, Hyper-V, and XenServer). This extract identifies the most fundamental principles, getting you to a sound security state that conforms to industry best practices.

  • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

    The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

  • The Human Face of Big Data: Data Driven

    On a small scale, the effects of software are benign. But at large companies, institutions, and agencies with hundreds of millions of users, something so apparently small as the choice of what should be a default setting has an immediate impact on the daily behavior patterns of a large percentage of the planet’s population.

  • Gartner: Best practices for I&O for cloud-readiness

    Cloud computing could end up being a hindrance rather than a help to an enterprise if not planned and implemented properly. In many infrastructure and operations (I&O) teams, it can be observed that previous failures are repeating themselves over and over. Very few organisations are mature enough in terms of people and process capabilities to be able to take cues from past failures and prepare themselves for the foreseeable as well as the unforeseen future.

  • BYOD – who carries the can?

    Balancing the costs, risks and benefits of bring your own device (BYOD) There is a trend among employees to want to use their personal choice of mobile device in the fulfilment of their work commitments. While this appears to bring many benefits for the employee to select their preferred device or devices and, on the face of it, reduces upfront costs for their employer, it does introduce significant on-going costs and risks for the organisation. However, with many appealing mobile consumer devices being offered, the trend is likely to increase, so organisations need to work out suitable strategies and policies to manage this complex and hybrid situation in the best interests of both themselves and their employees

  • An Information Architecture Vision

    Information is the lifeblood of an enterprise in a knowledge-based economy, but most are awash in a sea of data unable to leverage their information holdings to gain competitive advantage and/or improve services. This “big data” challenge is projected to increase significantly over time and provide major opportunities to those willing to move their organizations from a “data rich” to an “information smart” environment. This White Paper from the Open Group assesses the “big data” problem, proposes business and architecture visions, and develops an Enterprise Information Planning and Architecture Model. The vision and model will assist companies to systematically develop their information holdings and related services to achieve business value. The paper is based upon global best practices in business and government and addresses the lifecycle management of all types of information holdings and services from transaction processing to advanced decision support to records and archiving. This report is targeted at Business Planners and Analysts as well as Enterprise and Information Architecture practitioners. It is also of interest to all other professionals engaged in data, information, and knowledge management.

  • VIEW MORE ON : IT architecture
  • How to configure Mac OS X Server

    In the previous article in this series, we showed you how to secure a Mac using the functions built into its operating system, OS X. These functions range from simple password protection and patch management through to full-disk encryption. However, these are not the only security functions available. Indeed, OS X has a whole security and management infrastructure available for administrators called Managed Preferences, which can be managed most easily using OS X Server.

  • Maximising automation and the industrialisation of IT

    There is a huge amount of human expertise and time being wasted by the majority of IT operations teams. Increased automation is one of the most effective ways to overcome this problem. Only when the tools and services to achieve this are in place can the industrialisation of IT management processes begin. IT operations teams will then have more time to focus on transformation, innovation and deployment of new applications in the interests of the businesses they serve.

  • CWwomen: Come as you are, do what you love – Microsoft

    In this video from Computer Weekly’s Women in IT event, Dr Nicola Hodson talks about inclusion in the workplace, the current skills crisis in the technology industry, and recruiting skills for a more diverse base into enterprises.

  • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

    The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

  • The Human Face of Big Data: Data Driven

    On a small scale, the effects of software are benign. But at large companies, institutions, and agencies with hundreds of millions of users, something so apparently small as the choice of what should be a default setting has an immediate impact on the daily behavior patterns of a large percentage of the planet’s population.

  • The Human Face of Big Data: Pulse of the Planet

    After more than 50 years, the Computer Age as we’ve known it is ending. And what will replace it—perhaps we’ll call it the Informatics Age—will be a kind of Copernican Revolution in knowledge. That is, humans will no longer be the center of the data solar system, with all of the billions of devices orbiting around us, but will rather become just another player, another node, in an increasingly autonomous data universe.

  • Finance for IT decision makers: Making business cases

    This extract from Michael Blackstaff’s book, Finance for IT decision makers, teaches you how to make business and financial cases for IT projects. After reading this article you will be able to: • explain why organisations should attempt to quantify both the benefits and costs of a proposed investment; • explain the difference between a financial case and a business case; • describe some ways in which it may be possible to quantify ‘intangible benefits’; • list four kinds of financial benefit; • describe the difference between cash flow and profit, and explain why cash flow is usually regarded as the fundamental basis for investment decision-making.

  • 5G network for London by 2020, says Boris Johnson

    Mayor Boris Johnson to promise 5G mobile network for London by the end of the decade

  • BYOD – who carries the can?

    Balancing the costs, risks and benefits of bring your own device (BYOD) There is a trend among employees to want to use their personal choice of mobile device in the fulfilment of their work commitments. While this appears to bring many benefits for the employee to select their preferred device or devices and, on the face of it, reduces upfront costs for their employer, it does introduce significant on-going costs and risks for the organisation. However, with many appealing mobile consumer devices being offered, the trend is likely to increase, so organisations need to work out suitable strategies and policies to manage this complex and hybrid situation in the best interests of both themselves and their employees

  • An Information Architecture Vision

    Information is the lifeblood of an enterprise in a knowledge-based economy, but most are awash in a sea of data unable to leverage their information holdings to gain competitive advantage and/or improve services. This “big data” challenge is projected to increase significantly over time and provide major opportunities to those willing to move their organizations from a “data rich” to an “information smart” environment. This White Paper from the Open Group assesses the “big data” problem, proposes business and architecture visions, and develops an Enterprise Information Planning and Architecture Model. The vision and model will assist companies to systematically develop their information holdings and related services to achieve business value. The paper is based upon global best practices in business and government and addresses the lifecycle management of all types of information holdings and services from transaction processing to advanced decision support to records and archiving. This report is targeted at Business Planners and Analysts as well as Enterprise and Information Architecture practitioners. It is also of interest to all other professionals engaged in data, information, and knowledge management.

  • VIEW MORE ON : Innovation
  • Cloudwatt deploys SDN to orchestrate public cloud service

    Cloud firm Cloudwatt integrates Juniper OpenContrail SDN, NFV solution to support its public cloud environment

  • Search firms meet EU regulators over right to be forgotten

    Google, Microsoft and Yahoo have met EU data protection authorities to discuss the implications of the right to be forgotten ruling

  • The Open Group: Cloud buyers’ requirements questionnaire

    This White Paper describes a questionnaire that will help you identify your requirements for Cloud computing in a structured way, so that you can more easily reach the best solution. It contains questions about your enterprise – not about the products and services that you might be considering. It is put forward for discussion, with the intention that this discussion, and validation in the field, will result in a practical tool for use by enterprises.

  • Open Information Security Management Maturity Model (O-ISM3)

    Organizations in different business sectors and countries have different business requirements and risk tolerances. The O-ISM3 framework helps information Security Managers to evaluate their own operating environment and to plan their security management processes so they are consistent with and cost-effective for their organization’s business objectives.

  • The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF™ 9) and the US DoD

    This White Paper provides a comparative analysis of the two frameworks that describes where DoDAF products can be employed throughout the TOGAF ADM phases to develop a visual, integrated model of an architecture. The intended audience is the DoD architect who can benefit from a formal methodology to guide architecture efforts and result in a quality architecture description in a DoD-compliant format, and the TOGAF architect who can benefit by a formal set of defined models to capture output for each of the ADM phases. This document provides the architect with a map of the specific DoDAF 2.0 model that should be produced or consumed in a specific phase of TOGAF 9 with enough context to understand the fundamental concepts of both DoDAF and TOGAF.

  • Governance in IT and Architecture - TOGAF

    The primary audiences for this Paper are business and IT managers who are responsible for the performance of operations. However, enterprise architects also play a key role in supporting IT governance, including architecture governance. Governance is defined as giving direction to activities. In this Paper, the authors focus on governance of the IT domain and its alignment to business. Governance is viewed as a mechanism that influences the internal logic and decision-making of organizations. The internal logic is defined as a compromise between practically conflicting parameters. The mechanism that has to deal with these conflicting parameters consists of decision domains, governance structure, social processes between individuals and groups, and controls to ensure the proper functioning of IT governance. In the context of IT governance, enterprise architecture can be considered as a means for coordination of decision-making related to IT and business. Furthermore, it is recognized that enterprise architecture in its own right also needs to be governed.

  • IT Specialist Certification (ITSC) accreditation requirements

    The Open Group IT Specialist Certification Program (the Program) is designed to validate the existence of those qualities and skills in a professional that enable the effective development, implementation, and operation of IT solutions. The Program is skills and experience-based and goes beyond validating the mastery of any specific knowledge base. The Program includes a framework for accreditation of third parties to establish IT Specialist certification programs affiliated to The Open Group. The framework of accreditation and certification is specifically intended to standardize the process and criteria for IT Specialist professional certification and establish a foundation for the required skills and experience necessary to achieve such a distinction. The Program has been designed to be flexible and extensible so that the framework may be adopted by any industry, country, or organization.

  • Supporting requirements management in TOGAF

    Requirements management is an important activity in the process of designing and managing enterprise architectures. Requirements from various stakeholders form the basis for any change to an organization and its architecture. The quality of these requirements, the extent to which they are realized, and the ease with which they can be changed, determine the quality of any enterprise architecture. Nonetheless, many enterprise architecture modeling techniques focus on what the enterprise should do by representing “as-is” and “to-be” architectures in terms of informational, behavioral, and structural models at the different architectural layers (e.g., business, application, and technical infrastructure). Little or no attention is paid to represent (explicitly) the reasons; i.e., the why, behind the to-be architectures in terms of motivations, rationale, goals, and requirements.

  • Co-location services and datacentres feel the CCA heat

    A climate change agreement (CCA) for datacentres has come into force. How will its energy-efficiency rewards shape the industry?

  • EU funds project to boost European cloud computing market

    Cloudcatalyst project will assess cloud market in Europe, identify barriers to cloud adoption and provide tools to boost its growth

  • VIEW MORE ON : Legislation
  • Atos revenue slips but UK growth up 3.7%

    Revenue of Atos dipped 1.9% in the first half of 2014 because of slowdown in IT orders in Europe, but UK growth was up

  • Sleeping Android: the danger of dormant permissions

    A weakness in the permissions architecture of the Android platform means that apps could gain access to functionality without a user’s knowledge or consent, leaving them open to exploitation or abuse by attackers. Changes to the way the Android platform authorises permission requests could compromise the security of unwary users.

  • Smartself-service – a guide for buyers

    When looking for a self-service knowledge solution, it can be hard to distinguish between vendors. Most make very similar claims about the capabilities and benefits of their product. To make an informed choice, it is necessary to go beyond marketing rhetoric and assess the specifics of each vendor’s offering. Does the vendor’s feature set support the way in which you envisage implementing self-service? Can the vendor help to deliver an ideal customer experience? Just as important, is the vendor someone with whom you can see yourself happily working?

  • Negotiating cloud contracts

    This article, drawing on sources including interviews with cloud computing providers, users and other market actors, is the first in-depth research into how cloud contracts are negotiated. In particular, we have focused on instances where users have requested changes to providers’ standard terms, and the extent to which providers agreed to those changes. We have found that the terms that generated the most negotiation were provider liability, service level agreements, data protection and security, termination rights, unilateral amendments to service features, and intellectual property rights.

  • Virtualization Security: Protecting Virtualized Environments

    Hardening the hypervisor should really be viewed as a standard practice, much as it should be for enterprise servers of any importance. There are an incredible number of configuration options for the major platforms (ESXi, Hyper-V, and XenServer). This extract identifies the most fundamental principles, getting you to a sound security state that conforms to industry best practices.

  • Maximising automation and the industrialisation of IT

    There is a huge amount of human expertise and time being wasted by the majority of IT operations teams. Increased automation is one of the most effective ways to overcome this problem. Only when the tools and services to achieve this are in place can the industrialisation of IT management processes begin. IT operations teams will then have more time to focus on transformation, innovation and deployment of new applications in the interests of the businesses they serve.

  • The Demise in Effectiveness of Signature and Heuristic Based Antivirus

    Today there is an urgent emphasis being placed by vendors on the need for antivirus to be installed on an increasing number of computing platforms used within organisations. The aim of this is to satisfy risk controls while also forming part of an organisation’s technical information security strategy. This market demand for antivirus has led to a number of security products which do little to actually protect the user, their data or the organisation.

  • CWwomen: Come as you are, do what you love – Microsoft

    In this video from Computer Weekly’s Women in IT event, Dr Nicola Hodson talks about inclusion in the workplace, the current skills crisis in the technology industry, and recruiting skills for a more diverse base into enterprises.

  • The next frontier for managed print services

    The managed print services (MPS) market has matured since many organisations inked their first deal. Organisations moving beyond first generation engagements have often reached the end of their cost-cutting phase and are now looking for innovation to drive more business value. MPS is extending beyond the enterprise print environment to address requirements of mobile and remote workers, as well as encompass IT infrastructure and business process outsourcing. By leveraging the synergies of managed print services (MPS), business process services (BPS) and IT services (ITS) through a single provider, enterprises can drive business process innovation that pays continuous dividends.

  • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

    The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

  • VIEW MORE ON : Business issues
  • Smartself-service – a guide for buyers

    When looking for a self-service knowledge solution, it can be hard to distinguish between vendors. Most make very similar claims about the capabilities and benefits of their product. To make an informed choice, it is necessary to go beyond marketing rhetoric and assess the specifics of each vendor’s offering. Does the vendor’s feature set support the way in which you envisage implementing self-service? Can the vendor help to deliver an ideal customer experience? Just as important, is the vendor someone with whom you can see yourself happily working?

  • Negotiating cloud contracts

    This article, drawing on sources including interviews with cloud computing providers, users and other market actors, is the first in-depth research into how cloud contracts are negotiated. In particular, we have focused on instances where users have requested changes to providers’ standard terms, and the extent to which providers agreed to those changes. We have found that the terms that generated the most negotiation were provider liability, service level agreements, data protection and security, termination rights, unilateral amendments to service features, and intellectual property rights.

  • Virtualization Security: Protecting Virtualized Environments

    Hardening the hypervisor should really be viewed as a standard practice, much as it should be for enterprise servers of any importance. There are an incredible number of configuration options for the major platforms (ESXi, Hyper-V, and XenServer). This extract identifies the most fundamental principles, getting you to a sound security state that conforms to industry best practices.

  • Maximising automation and the industrialisation of IT

    There is a huge amount of human expertise and time being wasted by the majority of IT operations teams. Increased automation is one of the most effective ways to overcome this problem. Only when the tools and services to achieve this are in place can the industrialisation of IT management processes begin. IT operations teams will then have more time to focus on transformation, innovation and deployment of new applications in the interests of the businesses they serve.

  • The next frontier for managed print services

    The managed print services (MPS) market has matured since many organisations inked their first deal. Organisations moving beyond first generation engagements have often reached the end of their cost-cutting phase and are now looking for innovation to drive more business value. MPS is extending beyond the enterprise print environment to address requirements of mobile and remote workers, as well as encompass IT infrastructure and business process outsourcing. By leveraging the synergies of managed print services (MPS), business process services (BPS) and IT services (ITS) through a single provider, enterprises can drive business process innovation that pays continuous dividends.

  • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

    The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

  • The Human Face of Big Data: Pulse of the Planet

    After more than 50 years, the Computer Age as we’ve known it is ending. And what will replace it—perhaps we’ll call it the Informatics Age—will be a kind of Copernican Revolution in knowledge. That is, humans will no longer be the center of the data solar system, with all of the billions of devices orbiting around us, but will rather become just another player, another node, in an increasingly autonomous data universe.

  • Gartner: Best practices for I&O for cloud-readiness

    Cloud computing could end up being a hindrance rather than a help to an enterprise if not planned and implemented properly. In many infrastructure and operations (I&O) teams, it can be observed that previous failures are repeating themselves over and over. Very few organisations are mature enough in terms of people and process capabilities to be able to take cues from past failures and prepare themselves for the foreseeable as well as the unforeseen future.

  • BYOD – who carries the can?

    Balancing the costs, risks and benefits of bring your own device (BYOD) There is a trend among employees to want to use their personal choice of mobile device in the fulfilment of their work commitments. While this appears to bring many benefits for the employee to select their preferred device or devices and, on the face of it, reduces upfront costs for their employer, it does introduce significant on-going costs and risks for the organisation. However, with many appealing mobile consumer devices being offered, the trend is likely to increase, so organisations need to work out suitable strategies and policies to manage this complex and hybrid situation in the best interests of both themselves and their employees

  • An Information Architecture Vision

    Information is the lifeblood of an enterprise in a knowledge-based economy, but most are awash in a sea of data unable to leverage their information holdings to gain competitive advantage and/or improve services. This “big data” challenge is projected to increase significantly over time and provide major opportunities to those willing to move their organizations from a “data rich” to an “information smart” environment. This White Paper from the Open Group assesses the “big data” problem, proposes business and architecture visions, and develops an Enterprise Information Planning and Architecture Model. The vision and model will assist companies to systematically develop their information holdings and related services to achieve business value. The paper is based upon global best practices in business and government and addresses the lifecycle management of all types of information holdings and services from transaction processing to advanced decision support to records and archiving. This report is targeted at Business Planners and Analysts as well as Enterprise and Information Architecture practitioners. It is also of interest to all other professionals engaged in data, information, and knowledge management.

  • VIEW MORE ON : Operations & support
  • Smartself-service – a guide for buyers

    When looking for a self-service knowledge solution, it can be hard to distinguish between vendors. Most make very similar claims about the capabilities and benefits of their product. To make an informed choice, it is necessary to go beyond marketing rhetoric and assess the specifics of each vendor’s offering. Does the vendor’s feature set support the way in which you envisage implementing self-service? Can the vendor help to deliver an ideal customer experience? Just as important, is the vendor someone with whom you can see yourself happily working?

  • Negotiating cloud contracts

    This article, drawing on sources including interviews with cloud computing providers, users and other market actors, is the first in-depth research into how cloud contracts are negotiated. In particular, we have focused on instances where users have requested changes to providers’ standard terms, and the extent to which providers agreed to those changes. We have found that the terms that generated the most negotiation were provider liability, service level agreements, data protection and security, termination rights, unilateral amendments to service features, and intellectual property rights.

  • Maximising automation and the industrialisation of IT

    There is a huge amount of human expertise and time being wasted by the majority of IT operations teams. Increased automation is one of the most effective ways to overcome this problem. Only when the tools and services to achieve this are in place can the industrialisation of IT management processes begin. IT operations teams will then have more time to focus on transformation, innovation and deployment of new applications in the interests of the businesses they serve.

  • The next frontier for managed print services

    The managed print services (MPS) market has matured since many organisations inked their first deal. Organisations moving beyond first generation engagements have often reached the end of their cost-cutting phase and are now looking for innovation to drive more business value. MPS is extending beyond the enterprise print environment to address requirements of mobile and remote workers, as well as encompass IT infrastructure and business process outsourcing. By leveraging the synergies of managed print services (MPS), business process services (BPS) and IT services (ITS) through a single provider, enterprises can drive business process innovation that pays continuous dividends.

  • World-Class EA: The Agile Enterprise

    The concept of “agile” has recently come to the fore, typically in connection with technical activities, such as software development. Subsequently, the agile approach has been extended and applied to, for example, solution architecture activities. However, we suggest that agile is in fact a way of working, a mindset. It applies to more than just software development, or architecture, or any other one area of activity. The real benefit comes from applying an end-to-end agile delivery approach throughout the enterprise.

  • Finance for IT decision makers: Making business cases

    This extract from Michael Blackstaff’s book, Finance for IT decision makers, teaches you how to make business and financial cases for IT projects. After reading this article you will be able to: • explain why organisations should attempt to quantify both the benefits and costs of a proposed investment; • explain the difference between a financial case and a business case; • describe some ways in which it may be possible to quantify ‘intangible benefits’; • list four kinds of financial benefit; • describe the difference between cash flow and profit, and explain why cash flow is usually regarded as the fundamental basis for investment decision-making.

  • Gartner: Best practices for I&O for cloud-readiness

    Cloud computing could end up being a hindrance rather than a help to an enterprise if not planned and implemented properly. In many infrastructure and operations (I&O) teams, it can be observed that previous failures are repeating themselves over and over. Very few organisations are mature enough in terms of people and process capabilities to be able to take cues from past failures and prepare themselves for the foreseeable as well as the unforeseen future.

  • Integrating and monitoring business-to-business (B2B) value chains

    Increasing globalisation and diversity of both the suppliers and customers a given organisation has to deal with mean that supply chains are becoming ever more complex. Maintaining capabilities across broad functions requires systems that are well integrated, audited, secure and capable of being reported on at a granular level. Cloud-based approaches introduce new opportunities to gain access to advanced functionality, but also introduce issues around B2B integration for organisations.

  • BYOD – who carries the can?

    Balancing the costs, risks and benefits of bring your own device (BYOD) There is a trend among employees to want to use their personal choice of mobile device in the fulfilment of their work commitments. While this appears to bring many benefits for the employee to select their preferred device or devices and, on the face of it, reduces upfront costs for their employer, it does introduce significant on-going costs and risks for the organisation. However, with many appealing mobile consumer devices being offered, the trend is likely to increase, so organisations need to work out suitable strategies and policies to manage this complex and hybrid situation in the best interests of both themselves and their employees

  • An Information Architecture Vision

    Information is the lifeblood of an enterprise in a knowledge-based economy, but most are awash in a sea of data unable to leverage their information holdings to gain competitive advantage and/or improve services. This “big data” challenge is projected to increase significantly over time and provide major opportunities to those willing to move their organizations from a “data rich” to an “information smart” environment. This White Paper from the Open Group assesses the “big data” problem, proposes business and architecture visions, and develops an Enterprise Information Planning and Architecture Model. The vision and model will assist companies to systematically develop their information holdings and related services to achieve business value. The paper is based upon global best practices in business and government and addresses the lifecycle management of all types of information holdings and services from transaction processing to advanced decision support to records and archiving. This report is targeted at Business Planners and Analysts as well as Enterprise and Information Architecture practitioners. It is also of interest to all other professionals engaged in data, information, and knowledge management.

  • VIEW MORE ON : IT efficiency