Netscape fights back with Gecko

One-time browser market-leader Netscape has seen its position undermined, leaving Web designers with a dilemma over whether to...

One-time browser market-leader Netscape has seen its position undermined, leaving Web designers with a dilemma over whether to continue building sites that support Netscape's technology, writes Cliff Saran.

While a preview release of the forthcoming Netscape 6 has been available since April, the product has been plagued with delay.

Netscape 6, unlike the Microsoft browser, promises to be fully compliant with World-Wide Web Consortium standards for HTML. More significantly, the browser has been ripped apart, so that unlike the relatively bloated Internet Explorer technology, Netscape's browser uses a small Web browsing software component called Gecko.

The Gecko engine is responsible for interpreting and rendering the graphics, text and script on the Web. Netscape says Gecko has allowed it to separate the browser engine from the rest of the client software so it can be embedded and used to interpret, display and run Web content applications and services on any computing platform or device.

What this means is that Gecko can be small in size and modular. Netscape says it is capable of achieving rendering (displaying Web pages) speed superior to any other browser engine.

Companies, including IBM, Intel, Liberate, NetObjects, Nokia, Red Hat, and Sun Microsystems,have announced they have licensed Gecko for use in their own products.

What is Gecko?

  • Small and fast Web browser engine

  • Can be embedded in other applications

  • Forms the heart of Netscape 6 browser

  • Licensed by Sun, Red Hat, IBM and Intel

  • Read more on Operating systems software

    Start the conversation

    Send me notifications when other members comment.

    Please create a username to comment.

    -ADS BY GOOGLE

    SearchCIO

    SearchSecurity

    SearchNetworking

    SearchDataCenter

    SearchDataManagement

    Close