Microsoft to spend $2bn on DNA training for developers

Microsoft will spend $2bn (£1.25bn) on support and training for developers using Windows DNA 2000 over the next three years.

Microsoft will spend $2bn (£1.25bn) on support and training for developers using Windows DNA 2000 over the next three years.

Microsoft will spend $2bn (£1.25bn) on support and training for developers using Windows DNA 2000 over the next three years, writes Guy Campos.

Microsoft chairman Bill Gates announced the commitment at the company's Tech Ed conference in Orlando, Florida, last week in a bid to spur interest in Microsoft's next generation of software development tools for its Windows architecture.

"We've put together a very, very aggressive plan - the most dramatic plan in terms of investing in developer support that any company has ever come up with," said Gates.

Windows DNA 2000 is Microsoft's platform of applications for developing the next generation of Web services programmes incorporating support for the XML data exchange language.

Jon Collins, senior analyst at Bloor Research, said, "Microsoft faces a real challenge as it is entering new territory with no guarantee that it will succeed. It is relying on the wholesale adoption of the DNA architecture to lock people into using application components that run on Microsoft operating systems.

"The problem is there are many things going on in the world - ASPs, mobile technology, advances in storage and new application types - that do not run on Microsoft and if they can't get them to use Microsoft DNA their strategy falls apart."

Other speeches at the Tech Ed conference focused on the benefits to be gained from three elements of the Windows DNA 2000 platform. The first of these was the Simple Object Access Protocol (Soap) Toolkit for Visual Studio 6 which enables developers already using Visual Studio to build Web services using an open standards interoperability protocol.

The second element was Biztalk Orchestration software, which creates and manages business processes that span multiple applications, platforms, Web services and organisations inside and out a firewall.

Third was Rapid Application Development (Rad), for server tools in the next generations of Visual Studio, which accelerates and simplifies the creation of rich server-side applications and Web services.

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