Prime Minister Gordon Brown has reiterated the government's determination to press ahead with plans for ID cards at a cost of £5.4bn over 10 years, despite concerns over a series of data losses by government departments.

Computer Weekly has reported extensively on the ID Cards project. See the links below

News

ID Cards to cost £5.4bn over 10 years

Cameron pledges to scrap ID cards scheme

LSE calls for review of ID cards as costs keep rising

Home Office reveals first projects for National Identity Scheme

Government not ready to play its ID cards

BBC reveals defects in ID cards

Government offered alternative national ID scheme that doesn't require national database

Biometric ID card to be issued to foreign nationals within a year, Home Office says

Government pledges to press ahead with ID card scheme

Government may drop national fingerprint database for national ID card

ID card opponents call on Londoners to sign No2ID pledge

BAE Systems and Accenture pull out of UK's ID card project

Government will have to ask permission for ID card information

Steria latest bidder to pull out of ID card project

Government says ID cards will not be compulsory for all citizens

Wave of criticism hits government ID card relaunch

Government seeks to bury ID card reviews

ID card scheme must appeal to public to succeed, government advisor says

Comment and opinion

Have we lost the ID plot?

UK has lessons to learn from Hong Kong ID cards

Computer Weekly Security Think Tank

Has the government got the business case for ID cards right?

Blog posts

Tony Collins' IT Projects blog

David Lacey's Security blog

Phillip Virgo's When IT Meets Politics blog

The Privacy, Identity and Consent blog

Podcasts

National ID card scheme faces new criticism





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This was first published in April 2008

 

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