Togethersoft offers web development tools



  • Object UK, UK distributor for software development tools company Togethersoft, shipped version 4 of its Together software modelling tool at the...



  • Object UK, UK distributor for software development tools company Togethersoft, shipped version 4 of its Together software modelling tool at the Application Development 2000 show. The product includes Together Control Centre, which is designed for team-based development of Web applications using Enterprise Java Beans. New features include a code editor that automatically completes code as it is entered, along with an animated debugger.

    The company also launched an accompaning Web site called Together Communities. Essentially a portal for the data modelling community, the Web site can be found along with evaluation downloads of Together at http://www.objectuk.co.uk

  • Poet Software, which made its name in the niche object software market, is getting increasingly involved in online business-to-business (B2B) marketplaces through its eCatalog product. The company is considering moving into the area of hosted catalogue provision. Poet's eCatalog software is designed to pull data out of databases and ERP software, cleaning it and producing catalogues that reflect each customer's pricing and product selection. The online service would take companies' data straight from the database, tailoring it into catalogues before sending it to a B2B marketplace such as Ariba or Commerce One. Poet is also planning to sign a contract with Commerce One to integrate its e-commerce Catalogue environment with the online B2B trading supplier's marketplace. The XML-based product already supports Commerce One's xCBL XML-based Commerce Business Library, but the firms will tie together systems integrator, sales and marketing efforts.

  • Alan Boxer, managing director of the UK electronic commerce industry body eCentre UK, told software development consultants at the Application Development Show to smarten up and be more responsive to customers. He pointed to survey figures showing that larger companies felt software solutions were inconsistent, with untested code and "partial solutions dressed up as more". Over 60% of larger companies said their software had been delivered late and quality suffered if software was delivered on time. Some 55% said information was not provided in an intelligible, jargon-free way, and over 60% felt suppliers didn't embrace open systems, unless it suited the suppliers' agendas.

  • Read more on IT for small and medium-sized enterprises (SME)

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