Wikileaks forced to move again, but Swedes refuse to meet Assange

Wikileaks was forced to move its website after the company that provided its domain name service resigned claiming a sustained denial of service attack on Wikileaks was affecting its other business.

Wikileaks was forced to move its website to a Swiss server after the company that provided its domain name service resigned the business claiming a sustained denial of service attack on Wikileaks was affecting its other business.

Mark Stephens, the lawyer who represents Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, told the BBC's Today programme that the site was facing an attack of many millions of gigabits a second. "Of course no technical operator can cope with that kind of volume," he said.

Stephens went on to say that Assange faced other attacks, notably charges that he committed sex crimes in Sweden, one of the countries that used to host Wikileaks servers.

This week Interpol issued a red notice, which asked member police forces to arrest and extradite Assange to Sweden to face the charges. Assange has denied the allegations.

Stephens said the charges had been dropped, then revived in the week that Wikileaks published more than 250,000 sensitive documents from US diplomats that often painted unflattering portraits of national leaders.

"It's all coming together, and unfortunately, but perhaps to be expected when you criticise states," he said.

Stephens said he had no definitive proof who was behind the attacks. "I have an open and enquiring mind (on the subject), it would be foolish if I didn't," he said.

Elsewhere, internet founder Vint Cerf told Computer Weekly that one of the problems of cyberwarfare was to identify the attacker correctly. Any retaliation could cause vast collateral damage whether in virtual or physical terms, he said.

Stephens told the BBC that the Swedish public prosecutor and the British police "know where (Assange) is and how to get in touch with him".

He said Assange had been chasing the Swedish prosecutor to discuss his case, but had been ignored.

"Julian has been trying to get a meeting with the prosecutor since August," Stephens said. "He's had his name smeared with these allegations, he knows he's innocent, and he has tried to meet with the prosecutor for 40 days and 40 nights in Stockholm. She refused. She then gave him permission to leave the country when he asked."

According to Stephens, when he came to the UK, Assange told Stephens that when he Googled his name in Sweden about 50% of the search results returned mentions of rape. He asked Stephens to set up a meeting with the Swedish prosecutor. "I want to get this resolved," Stephens quoted Assange as saying. To no avail.

Stephens said, "It's very unsatisfactory. If the prosecutor had any concern for the women involved or justice she would pick up the phone and get in touch with Julian. She knows how to do it. She has set her face against it. It is bonkers. It is bizarre, and it is unique in my legal experience."

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