C# falls flat with IT managers

Most IT managers think there is no need for Micro-soft to develop the C# language as an alternative to Java.

Most IT managers think there is no need for Micro-soft to develop the C# language as an alternative to Java.

Guy Campos

Respondents in this week's Computer Weekly/Harvey Nash Big Question poll said they were concerned about a proliferation of similar languages and thought Microsoft would fragment a de facto industry standard for its own benefit.

C# is seen by industry observers as a replacement for Microsoft's Visual J++, a modified Java applications development package, should its use be imperilled by an ongoing court case with Sun Microsystems.

Sun claims Microsoft has no right to modify Java for its own purposes and make the platform-independent language dependent on Windows.

One interviewee said, "I don't believe there is really a need for another development language. However, I am sure Microsoft will, as usual, do everything possible to create a need, and will, I am sure, succeed in this endeavour."

Another said, "I do not know what functionality is proposed with the new language. My suspicion is that it is more of a competitive than a customer offering."

However, one IT manager who also did not want a new language, expressed dissatisfaction with current languages. "I would just like some of the existing ones to work," he said.

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