Feature

Budget 2002: What we want from the Chancellor

The Chancellor has the opportunity to take some simple measures in this week's budget to help IT users and resellers and help develop the IT infrastructure on which the economy and e-government depend. Key industry players spell out the issues for our industry and the action we need from the Chancellor.

Words are not enough
After all the rhetoric, the IT industry is now counting on the government to act in order to boost business. This is what IT professionals want to see in the Budget.
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Suppliers call for Gordon's help
John Higgins, director general of the Computing Services and Software Association and Joe Edwards, director of retail finance at Computacenter, spell out some simple measures the Chancellor should introduce to boost business.
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Open letter to the Chancellor
Colin Beveridge presents his budget wishlist and promises to dance naked around Piccadilly Circus if the Chancellor acts on his advice.
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Users urge Chancellor to set timetable for training revamp
With the budget approaching IT users and suppliers are pressing Gordon Brown to take urgent action to avert a potential crisis in the beleaguered UK training market.
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Contractors: IR35 is strangling small firms
The Professional Contractors Group (PCG) has called on the Chancellor to use the Budget to help small businesses operate with confidence and remove the climate of uncertainty that is blighting the sector.
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What has the budget ever done for IT?
As the Chancellor prepares to deliver his latest budget speech, we look back at what this government has already given the IT industry and what it is likely to do for IT in the future.
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This was first published in February 2003

 

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