RFID ink product could track humans

A US company has launched a chip-less RFID (radio frequency identification) ink that can be used to track both animals and people.

A US company has launched a chip-less RFID (radio frequency identification) ink that can be used to track both animals and people.

Visible or invisible ink “tatoos” can be applied to the skin and tracked by RFID readers positioned a few feet away.

The company, Somark, said it had successfully tested its Biocompatible Chipless RFID Ink product on cattle and laboratory rats and proved the “efficacy of injecting and reading a ‘tattoo’ within the skin of animals”.

The technology will be used initially in the livestock industry to help identify and track cattle, and help mitigate export trade loss from BSE scares.

Secondary target markets include laboratory animals, dogs and cats, prime cuts of meat and military personnel, according to the company.

Ramos Mays, Somark chief scientist, said, “This proves the ability to create a synthetic biometric or fake fingerprint with Biocompatible Chipless RFID Ink and read it through hair.”

More information:

Trackable clothing unveiled

IBM launches new RFID software

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