Save the Children brings in two-factor authentication

Save the Children has installed a two-factor authentication security system after the charity's head of operations and communications decided the previous system needed to be improved.

Save the Children has installed a two-factor authentication security system after the charity's head of operations and communications decided the previous system needed to be improved.

More than 4,000 employees work in 52 different countries, making a secure network necessary, said Andrew Brenson, a spokesman for the charity.

"We had a Citrix system before which was a single-factor authentication," he added, "Users could access it from anywhere in the world on the web, using a user name and password. This wasn't really satisfactory and I decided we had to find a two-factor authentication system."

He decided to use a SecurAccess system from SecurEnvoy, which uses mobile phones to provide the second code users need to log on.

When users start using the system, they pick a four-digit pin code in addition to their username and password. The system then automatically sends them their first six-digit code to their mobile phones as a text, which they use to log on next time.

The codes can sit on the phones for two to three weeks. When the user logs on using the six-figure code, the system automatically sends them a new code to use next time.

"Because this is a charity, it is meant to be used by people are all over the world, so it had to be flexible. It also means cost is an issue, and this way we did not have to spend money on new hardware. By using the mobile phones we are getting more utilisation out of something we already had," said Brenson. "Before, our systems were a little bit vulnerable, and now they are not."

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