Another 'unique' job site launches

Feature

Another 'unique' job site launches



On-line job site, www.erecruitment.com, went live last week, offering graduates and IT job seekers an agency-free environment in which to source employment.

The service, which anticipates finding work for up to 30,000 people in its first year of business, claims to accurately match candidates with employers and vacancies using 'unique' software technology that has been developed in-house, and for which a patent is pending. Based on detailed information supplied by both parties, the system compiles a short-list of suitable candidates for each company-posted position.

It also offers an on-line testing facility to ensure that job seekers are in fact "suitably qualified" for advertised vacancies.

Once a match has been made, job seekers are notified via the system, and candidates and clients then correspond to arrange interviews and so on.

According to chief executive Glenn Smith, erecruitment.com offers companies "a brand new way" of recruiting, and significantly reduces the time taken by traditional agencies to fill a position.

"By combining my recruitment background with the opportunities made possible by the internet, we've come up with a process that replaces many of the things a very good recruitment consultant would do, but in a fraction of the time, at a fraction of the cost, and totally hassle-free," he says.

Job seekers use the service for free while companies pay an annual, fixed price fee to advertise their vacancies on the site.

According to the company, over 50 businesses, including PA Consulting, Psion, Novell and Lucent Technologies, have already registered to use its service.


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This was first published in August 2000

 

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