Feature

Analyst paper: the role of information in an SOA

Bill McCrosky and Allen Luniewski

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A service oriented architecture (SOA) strives to provide an information infrastructure that is highly responsive to rapidly changing business requirements, such as new competition, mergers, acquisitions, business models, and regulatory compliance. SOA has shown great promise in reaching these goals and is rapidly gaining widespread interest and acceptance.

However, it can be argued that SOA efforts to date have emphasised information processes and have paid little attention to information management. This report attempts to rectify this imbalance, examining and elaborating on the role of information architecture within an SOA.

Download the report: The Role of Information in an SOA

This article was originally published by Cutter Consortium © 2007 Cutter Consortium. All rights reserved. Reproduced with permission.

Further reading

More analyst papers on service oriented architecture >>

New routes with enterprise mashups >>

SOA and Web services security hinge on XML gateways >>

Identity management for the SOA era >>

SOA causes sore heads and confusion >>

Identifying service providers’ SOA value >>

Using SOA as a competitive weapon >>

Case studies

Lessons from the SOA high flyers >>

Switch to Web 2.0 boosts business agility for uSwitch >>

Dow's SOA blazes a trail for SAP R/2 users >>

Merrill Lynch uses SOA to overhaul operations >>

Hampshire's five-year SOA deal opens door to partnership working >>

Carphone Warehouse cuts order management and fulfilment times >>

UBS moves to SOA for managing financial apps >>

The Tote backs SOA in race to improve customer service >>

British Energy Group gets flexible with SOA >>

ING Direct uses SOA for new service >>


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This was first published in August 2007

 

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