Report any e-crime to local police



John Riley

Groundswell

When it comes to tackling computer crime, especially e-crime, there's a crippling Catch-22 situation....



John Riley

Groundswell

When it comes to tackling computer crime, especially e-crime, there's a crippling Catch-22 situation. E-crime is growing, but, for many reasons, few people are reporting it. Therefore, as there are no reliable figures in the UK, the police remain underfunded and policing priorities shift elsewhere.

True, industry currently has little confidence in the police force's ability to solve e-crime. One tale I heard, for example, is of a major company that wanted to report 25,000 cases of the same £14.99 fraud. Should that mean filling in 25,000 forms? Or one? How should that be reported? Eventually, this particular company agreed not to bother.

But that was wrong. Government runs on statistics. We cannot expect the police initially to solve many e-crimes like this £14.99 fraud. They are under-resourced. I've been told that there are more IT crime specialists in one major bank alone than in the whole UK police force.

Nevertheless, our common duty, whether as companies or as individuals, is to get crime reported at the local police station, if necessary asking for it to go no further - as in racial discrimination complaints. Desk sergeants may object, but don't be put off - this is the only way to get the statistics to move forward. To get fast change with government, we sometimes have to swamp the system.

Read more on IT risk management

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCIO

SearchSecurity

SearchNetworking

SearchDataCenter

SearchDataManagement

Close