Reaping the rewards of your Y2K fix



John Riley

Groundswell

Senior IT staff members emerging bleary eyed from their Y2K bunkers this week are finding that the...



John Riley

Groundswell

Senior IT staff members emerging bleary eyed from their Y2K bunkers this week are finding that the millennium bug has left them with huge advantages, but also huge challenges. There is much politicking to be done.

Certainly, there are minor challenges such as remediation, and infection by Trojan horses, plus a load of other nasties to track down.

But the real challenge this year will be to leverage the true by-products of the Y2K bug-hunt such as enhanced project management skills, and better horizontal understanding and liaison channels with the business.

Paradoxically, however, just as IT is gearing itself to exploit these new strengths the gap between IT and the business is growing -all too often exacerbated by e-business experimentation.

Of course, e-business (by which I mean transformation of the business using Internet-based technologies) has to be led by the CEO - or at least the board. But for ultimate success IT has to be intimately involved.

Business units are usually vertically focused, are more likely to lay themselves open to getting screwed on software licences, and usually won't think about scaling up with the supply chain, logistics, transportation, manufacturing and general business systems.

So the bigger the gap between IT and the business the more likely the medium-term business problems. Take note, City analysts - mark those futures up or down accordingly.

John Riley

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