Opinion

Thought for the day:It's good to talk . . . if you can

Hard-hitting IT columnist Simon Moores gives his personal take on the hot issue of the day.It's a secret, you know, the new BT Anytime Lite Connect number. Well, almost a secret, but what kind of business genius thinks up a name like BT Anytime Connect Lite in the first place?

Looking back on previous columns, this is not the first time I have had occasion to fire a broadside at BT and its Internet service.

It's bad enough that I can't aggregate my Internet charges into my BT One bill, but for heavens sake, you would have thought that if BT was going to change its access number, it would announce the new number in big red letters on its Web site.

Wrong. As of this evening, as I caustically pointed out to BT Anytime Lite Connect's telephone support number (calls are charged at 50p per minute), the access number given is a number that doesn't work correctly.

In fact, it redirects you to a BT OpenWorld Web page called "dialleroutof date.html" and freezes Internet Explorer (more of that in a moment). Only by calling the helpline are you relieved of hopeless hours spent trying to work out why your browser isn't working properly.

For a further 50p, I learned that the BT Openworld Web page catches the unwary, which is anyone not using the number they haven't told them about, who attempts to download the BT dialler with the correct number.

A word to the wise here. If, like me, you use a personal firewall, I suspect it's a factor in blocking any attempt to download the new dialler in background, and the BT dialler software, if you use it, forces you to the BT Openworld Web site whether you like it or not. It's preferable to use the dial-up number it gives you and plug it into a dial-up network's properties in Windows.

So look away now if you would rather discover for yourself what the new number is for BT Anytime Lite Connect. Perhaps by now it's on the Web page and, if it isn't yet, here's the number anyway - 0808 9933163

What's your view?
Do you have any favourite BT moments? Let us know with an e-mail.>>


Zentelligence Setting the world to rights with the collected thoughts and opinions of the futurist writer, broadcaster and Computer Weekly columnist Simon Moores.

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This was first published in July 2002

 

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