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RSA Conference rallies the IT security industry

The RSA Conference 2009 got off to a quiet start in San Francisco yesterday with a few preliminary tutorials, but today sees the first keynote speakers take to the stage.

First up will be RSA president Art Coviello to attempt to rally the IT security industry to collaborate in tacking the challenges of new technologies like virtualisation and cloud computing.

Newly appointed Symantec president and CEO Enrique Salem will take a similar approach as he looks at how to confront the rapid growth of malware that is now outpacing the development of legitimate software.

Still on a collaborative theme, Scott Charney, corporate VP of Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing division, will campaign for cross-industry efforts to create a more trusted, privacy enhanced internet experience.

Other industry executives lined up for this week's conference include John Chambers, CEO of Cisco Systems, Dave DeWalt, CEO of McAfee, and Philippe Courtot, CEO of Qualys.

In addition to security industry executives, the US government will be represented in keynote presentations by Melissa Hathaway, the Obama Administration's acting director for cyberspace and Lieutenant General Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Agency (NSA) and chief of central security services.

Hathaway is expected to present the Administration's promised 60-day Cyber Security Review and Alexander will speak on the prospects for public-private partnership for cybersecurity.

The conference runs for the rest of this week and is expected to highlight issues such as malware proliferation, virtualisation, cloud computing and national cybersecurity against a backdrop of budget constraints in the economic downturn.


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