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Confidence ebbs in email archiving

Joe O'Halloran

A survey by AIIM, the Enterprise Content Management (ECM) Association, has found that nearly two-thirds (63%) of UK respondents have little or no confidence that their firms’ emails related to commitments and obligations are recorded, complete and recoverable.

This figure represents a continuing decline in confidence in email traceability: in the same survey in 2007, 56% expressed their lack of confidence. In general public sector organisations, the lack of confidence rose to over 70%.

AIIM ventured the opinion that the research also reflected a general lack of control over all non-paper records, with 51% not confident that their electronic information is accurate, accessible and trustworthy, a rise of 7% compared to twelve months earlier.  When asked, “If your organisation was sued by a former customer or citizen, how long would it take to produce all of the information related to that person?”, just  over a quarter of respondents (27%) cited more than one month.

The results are indicative that investment in document and email management systems is failing to keep pace with the email deluge explained Doug Miles, AIIM’s UK Managing Director. He commented, "It also suggests that recent high profile cases may have alerted organisations to their potential vulnerabilities. For larger organisations, savings in legal discovery costs alone could justify an ECM investment.”

AIIM hopes to address these issues at its 2008 AIIM Roadshow,  which visits Glasgow , Bolton, Coventry , Bristol and London from 28 April to 2 May. This year’s educational theme is “Piecing together the Information Puzzle” and industry experts will deliver information and advice throughout the week.

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