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Women IT managers earn more than males

Will Hadfield

Female IT managers are paid more  than their male counterparts, according to a survey of 2,288 senior IT managers.

The research, by the Chartered Institute of Management shows the IT profession treats women more fairly that other sectors, with female IT managers earning an average of £700 more than their male counterparts.

"The main issue is that in IT pay [for men and women] is broadly similar while in the public sector there's a £4,000 difference. In financial services, the average salary is £55,700 for males and £41,700 for females," said CMI spokesman, Mike Petrook.

The IT department is one of the most lucrative homes for women seeking a managerial position. Only general management, actuarial and financial posts pay women more.

The average female manager in the IT department of a large user will be paid £43,488 this year, compared with £41,748 last year.

Both male and female IT professionals would increase their salaries by joining an IT supplier, the survey suggests. The average salary for a female manager at a supplier will be £45,869 this year, down from £47,315 in 2004.

But female managers are more likely to leave their high-paying jobs than men. The turnover rate for female managers is 9.5%, compared with 6.5% for men, and the level of resignation is 3.9%. Just 2.5% of men resign from their managerial posts.

* Some 3.6 million part-time employees work in jobs that fail to use the skills, qualifications or experience they developed when employed full time. According to the Equal Opportunities Commission, which wrote the report, 44% of working women in 2004 were part time.


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