Amdahl name disappears into Fujitsu

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Amdahl name disappears into Fujitsu



Fujitsu’s Amdahl subsidiary in the US has been renamed Fujitsu Technology Solutions and has announced new product lines under the new name.

Although the Japanese giant has decided to sell under its own name, the company will continue to sell and support the Unix and Intel-based server ranges and storage devices previously sold by Amdahl. Most of the former Amdahl executives have been transferred to the new company, which is still based in Sunnyvale, California.

The decision is the latest move in a major $500m (£352m) restructuring of the former Amdah operation, which has seen the company abandon further development of its IBM clone mainframes forthwith and the announcement that it will completely withdraw from this market within two years.

Fujitsu Technology Solutions has announced two new product lines in its first week of operation to augment the Amdahl ranges.

The first, the Primepower Sparc/ Solaris-based Unix range, is being sold in Europe by Amdahl and Fujitsu Siemens but, surprisingly, the second line, a new range of Primergy Intel-based servers, is not yet being sold in Europe at all.

Two of the new servers, the TS120 and TS200, are ultra thin 1U (4.45 cm high, pizza box) models aimed at the Internet and application service provider markets. They come with one or two Pentium III processors running at 800MHz or 933MHz, and support up to 2Gbyte main memory and up to 72Gbyte disc.

The other introduction is the ES320 application server, which also has one or two Pentium III processors but with a faster top end clock speed of 1GHz and a larger maximum memory of 4Gbyte.

Disc storage expands to 192Gbyte. It is available in either rack-mounted or floor- standing versions.


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