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Managing traffic: Keeping your content where it belongs

As business needs demand that customers and partners receive sensitive enterprise data, there is an increased urgency to protect outbound messaging content. From intellectual property theft to compromised customer data, the loss of confidential data threatens an organization financially and legally. In fact, 8 out of 10 SearchSecurity.com and Information Security readers thought protection against information leakage was an important feature for messaging platforms, according to a recent survey. Worse yet, one-third of readers said they don't have an effective strategy.

This lesson will outline the options on the market today and offer advice in terms of establishing sound business processes.

   Webcast: Outbound content security: Keeping your content where it belongs

   Technical article: Outbound content filtering requires products and processes

   Podcast: Countdown: Plugging the dam -- understanding where and how content leaks

   Quiz: Managing traffic: Keeping your content where it belongs

   About the instructor

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Messaging Security School home
Managing traffic: Keeping your content where it belongs
The changing threat of email attacks
Defending mobile devices from viruses and spyware
Essential practices for securing mobile devices
Secure instant messaging
Countermeasures for malicious email code
Securing Exchange
This lesson is sponsored by SonicWall. Download these white papers:
A Guide to Delivering Dynamic Protection in an Evolving Threat Environment
A Guide to Keeping Email Legal: Four Pillars of Compliance


Webcast: Outbound content security: Keeping your content where it belongs
Length: 50 minutes
This webcast examines the evolution of the content security gateway as it evolves beyond just blocking spam and Web filtering, emphasizing the techniques and technologies used to ensure both structured and unstructured data doesn't leave your organization over email, instant messaging, HTTP or any other communication vehicle. This presentation will consider whether it makes more sense to use an existing gateway product, a managed service or whether a new class of device is required to meet the need.


Technical tip: Outbound content filtering requires products and processes
Expensive and damaging corporate data breaches often happen because sensitive information silently slips out the door with unknowing employees or malicious hackers. But those cracks can be patched with an outbound content filtering strategy that covers training, processes and the right technology.


Podcast: Countdown: Plugging the dam -- understanding where and how content leaks
Length: 15 minutes
In many cases, organizations have no idea that their standard business processes that not only enable, but also reward the inadvertant leakage of critical private content. This podcast counts down the top five different use cases where data leaks as a result of outdated data handling policies, and what can be done to make sure these situations don't put your organization in an exposed position.


Quiz: Managing traffic -- keeping your content where it belongs
A five-question multiple-choice quiz to test your understanding of the content presented in this lesson of SearchSecurity.com's Messaging Security School.


About the instructor:
@24443
Mike Rothman is president and principal analyst of Security Incite, an industry analyst firm in Atlanta, and the author of The Pragmatic CSO: 12 Steps to Being a Security Master. Rothman is also SearchSecurity.com's expert-in-residence on information security management. Get more information about the Pragmatic CSO at http://www.pragmaticcso.com, read his blog at http://blog.securityincite.com, or reach him via e-mail at mike.rothman (at) securityincite (dot) com.


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