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FAST takes record £1.4m last month from software piracy

Tash Shifrin

A record £1.4m was recovered by anti-piracy enforcement body, the Federation Against Software Theft on behalf of UK software firms last month.

The figure – the highest ever for a single month – brings the federation’s total to £7.3m over the past six years. The federation, which represents 160 members from across the software industry, urged “a strong stance in every country” against software piracy.

Director general John Lovelock said, “The record amount already recovered this year is symptomatic of the ongoing battle we face, one that is not going away no matter what level of education we undertake, and despite the legal ramifications of illegal software use.”

But he added that the federation was “increasingly seeing” businesses taking action “to put their software assets in order”.

This was “an integral part of the growth in awareness of corporate governance and the impact of compliance within both the public and private sectors”, he said.

Increasing concern against piracy and illegal dealing has also seen major software firms cracking down. Last month Microsoft filed 26 separate US lawsuits targeting firms believed to have pirated software or to have been involved in “hard-disc loading” – installing unlicensed software on computers they sell.


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