TechTarget

IBM claims smallest solid-state light emitter

Researchers at IBM have used microscopic carbon molecules to emit light, a breakthrough that could replace silicon as the...

This Article Covers

Data centre

Researchers at IBM have used microscopic carbon molecules to emit light, a breakthrough that could replace silicon as the foundation of chips and lead to faster computers and telecommunication equipment.

The research team focused on ultra-tiny, tube-shaped carbon molecules, or nanotubes, which are more than 50,000 times thinner than an average human hair. The scientists were able to engineer the carbon nanotubes not only to conduct current, but to emit light.

Light, already the foundation of today's high-speed communication networks, could, someday, be used to process data in computers and other electronic devices, as engineers run out of ways to cram more performance into silicon chips.

IBM's solid-state light emitter which, the company claimed is the world's smallest, is a single nanotube, measuring 1.4 nanometers in diameter and configured into a three-terminal transistor.

The research team detected light with a wavelength of 1.5 micrometers, a wavelength that is already widely used in optical communications, IBM said. Nanotubes with different diameters could generate light with different wavelengths used in other applications.

CW+

Features

Enjoy the benefits of CW+ membership, learn more and join.

Read more

0 comments

Oldest 

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCIO

SearchSecurity

SearchNetworking

SearchDataCenter

SearchDataManagement

Close