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CeBIT: Nokia reveals Edge and music phones

Nokia has unveiled its first mobile phone for packet-based Edge (Enhanced Data rates for GSM Evolution) networks in Europe, together with several other products targeting both corporate and consumer users.

The company claimed its Edge-enabled 6220 provides download speeds of up to 118.4Kbps, twice as fast as GPRS (General Packet Radio Service). The phone, with an integrated digital camera, also features a high-quality screen, with 128x128 pixels and 4,096 colors, Java technology and MMS (Multimedia Messaging Service).

The tri-mode 6220 runs on the 900 and 1800 bands in Europe, as well as the 1900 band in the US. The product will ship later this year in Europe, Africa and the Asia Pacific (EMEA) region

 Nokia also introduced its 810 car phone for European markets, which supports voice and data communications in HSCSD (High-Speed Circuit Switched Data) and GPRS networks, and includes a wireless interface supporting Bluetooth technology.

Another feature of the 810 car phone is its Navi wheel, which can be turned both clockwise and counter-clockwise for fast navigation to names and numbers.

For music lovers, Nokia announced its 3300 music phone, which incorporates a portable digital music player, a stereo FM radio, a digital recorder, advanced ring tones, enhanced messaging services such as MMS, and games.

Nokia claimed  the phone is the first GSM (Global Service for Mobile Communications) handset supporting True Tones, a technology that provides ring tones with music. With True Tones, users can use songs, nature sounds, and special effects as ring tones.

The product will start shipping in the second quarter of 2003 in the EMEA region.

Nokia did not provide prices for any of these three products.


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