News

Microsoft breach is bad news for users

James Rogers
Microsoft's security breach could prove bad news for users if the hacker has tampered with source codes.

James Rogers

Microsoft's security breach could prove bad news for users if the hacker has tampered with source codes.

Paul Rogers, network security analyst at MIS Corporate Defence Solutions, explained, "Microsoft has played this down, but if an evil hacker has uploaded a malicious code to open a backdoor in the operating system, that could then give him access to other users."

John Stewart, chief executive of signify.net echoed these fears. "If there is a chance that the Microsoft source code has been infected then that would shatter my confidence," he said.

So far, Microsoft has denied that any of its source codes were corrupted, but the company has confirmed that the hacker viewed source code under development for future products.

Shaun Orpen, director of corporate marketing at Microsoft, said, "Any sort of security breach such as this is concerning, but, as far as I know, there should be no implications for any of our customers."

The fact that an outsider gained access to Microsoft's inner sanctum should cause grave, however, concern. "This is bound to send shivers down the spines of corporate IT executives," said Gary Cooper, director of research at analyst firm Butler Group. "If I was the director of a company that uses IT extensively, I would want my IT director in front of me to explain why it won't happen to me."

Microsoft will increase the euro price of some software packages by 6% from 1 December. The company cited the declining value of the currency as the reason for the move.

This is the second price increase in a year and follows a similar euro-prompted 5.8% increase last July.

The increase will only affect software that has been localised for languages in the euro zone. Microsoft said UK prices for English language versions of its software will not be affected.


Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy