Microsoft to meet DOJ over Longhorn

Microsoft is expected to meet with officials from the US Department of Justice (DOJ) in mid-February to examine whether Longhorn,...

Microsoft is expected to meet with officials from the US Department of Justice (DOJ) in mid-February to examine whether Longhorn, the next major version of the Windows operating system, will satisfy anti-trust safeguards.

As part of the anti-trust settlement reached at the end of 2002, Microsoft is committed to making sure that all versions of Windows allow easier integration with software from other companies, including browsers, media players and middleware.

The meeting between Microsoft and the DoJ will be the first of many before Longhorn reaches the market. The desktop version of Longhorn is planned for next year and the server version is expected in 2007.

The technical committee at the DoJ has already pointed out some concerns it has with integration issues around Windows XP and Service Pack 2 for the platform. Microsoft says it is addressing these issues.

The European Commission ordered Microsoft last year to release a version of Windows for the European market that does not include Windows Media Player, to make it easier for rival media players to compete. Microsoft said recently such a version would be available "in weeks".

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