Feature

User groups challenge the era of IT consultants

A new age of self help among corporate IT users could end their reliance on external IT consultants, according to Michael Gough, group chief executive of the National Computing Centre.

Welcoming Legal & General IT director Margaret Smith as the incoming chief executive of NCC subsidiary CIO-Connect, Gough said, "Users are regaining control of their own agendas. Instead of being dependent on consultants, users can benefit from the experiences of each other."

The NCC now has a structured approach to help all levels of IT users help themselves, following the acquisition of several user oriented organisations, said Gough.

"We provide best practice development through our Principia suite of services; professional development through Certus and the Impact Programme; and executive development through CIO-Connect," he said. "We are enabling CIOs to gain control of their own agendas and avoid excessive dependency on external consultants.

"If we get this right, we will rekindle the British IT industry."

Smith, who takes up her new post in January next year, shares Gough's vision. "I believe passionately in IT and in this country and through CIO-Connect I believe we can help UK business to be the best it can be," she said.

CIO-Connect

CIO-Connect is a development forum for IT directors in blue chip organisations. It is owned by the National Computing Centre.

CIO-Connect views IT as another facet of the business and not separate from it. For their £12,000 annual fee the 200 members gain access to a series of high-level events and meetings aimed at honing their business focus.

Margaret Smith, IT director at Legal & General, will replace former Post Office IT director John Hanby as chief executive of CIO-Connect in January 2005.

For more on CIO-Connect, click here >>


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This was first published in October 2004

 

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