Feature

University sees savings in Linux

De Montfort University is anticipating major cost savings and service efficiencies from using open source Linux as well as Novell's identity management software.

The university is consolidating its IT management system on to SuSE Linux and Novell Netware. The system caters for up to 27,000 users, comprising 23,000 students and 3,500 faculty and other staff.

Like many organisations, De Montfort's IT systems had grown at a departmental level, and it had a range of operating platforms with differing levels of service. It needed to consolidate its IT and manage fewer systems and associated IDs and passwords.

"We were running a variety of operating systems across multiple locations including NetWare, Linux, Unix and Windows," said IT director Roy Adams. "Openness and reliability were top priorities and Linux best met these needs."

De Montfort is deploying Novell's Open Enterprise Server and identity and access management systems to centralise the management of users, and adopting Zenworks to streamline management.

Novell Open Enterprise Server is a dual operating system that includes both NetWare and SuSE Linux Enterprise Server. The product includes network services such as directory management, clustering and file and print. Over time, the university will migrate its existing Microsoft file and printer servers and Solaris systems to Open Enterprise Server.

Chris Semmens, team leader at De Montfort, said, "We looked at Microsoft Active Directory and other solutions, but Novell Edirectory came out on top for scalability, flexibility and the overall maturity of the directory. We took great care in making this selection because a global directory is essential for efficient IT management in a complex environment such as ours."

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This was first published in July 2005

 

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