TMB accreditation scheme will shift focus to companies

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TMB accreditation scheme will shift focus to companies

The government-backed Technology Means Business (TMB) scheme to accredit resellers selling e-commerce and IT systems to SMEs is to switch to companies rather than individuals.

The DTI-backed group has also brought Computer 2000 on board to join existing supporters Intel, Microsoft and Compaq to recruit ten resellers each for a pilot accreditation programme.

TMB agency manager, Paul Abbot, admitted the scheme, launched last October (see MicroScope, 31 October 2000), had fallen short of its original aims and had managed to accredit fewer than 30 resellers.

He said resellers had not been beating a path to TMB’s door because of the £1,000 per person cost of accreditation, coupled with the usual constraints of time away from work and the other vendor accreditation programmes they had to keep up with.

Abbot said the group would be seeking to focus on accrediting companies as a whole rather than individuals within them.

“We have around 400 accredited individuals, but they are mostly public sector. The challenge is to get more people from resellers which hitherto haven’t been interested,” he explained.

Abbot added the scheme was also examining ways to pass on sales leads to TMB-accredited resellers from its database of SMEs.

Ray Broadbridge, managing director of Durham-based assembler and services group Nectar Electronics, said he had completed the TMB accreditation and found it useful for getting a cross-vendor approach to his customers’ needs.

“It helps me go to clients and get to the bottom of what they need rather than what they think they want. It is better than vendor-accredited courses because they tend to channel people into one way of thinking,” he claimed.


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This was first published in March 2001

 

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