Feature

NetLedger upgrades suite and takes new name

In conjunction with upgrading its integrated ERP and CRM suite, NetLedger has rechristened itself. The ASP, in fact, assumed the name of its software product: NetSuite.

In its first official move under the new moniker, NetSuite issued NetSuite 9.0.

NetSuite CEO Zach Nelson said that the name change is an evolution of the software itself. New to NetSuite 9.0 are improvements to the dashboard, commissions' management, integrated e-commerce, and matrix lists. 

NetSuite's upgraded dashboard includes customisable views based on user roles, the ability to drag and drop portlets into the dashboard, and the Xtreme List Editing feature which can be used to adjust lists from within the dashboard. 

Commission management enables salespeople and managers to track the commissions they are earning, as well as to model how much they could bring in from a prospective deal. 

Nelson said that NetSuite 9.0 includes integrated e-commerce capabilities that enable customers to build database-driven e-commerce websites that leverage the product's back-office features. 

Since this iteration of NetSuite is aimed at product distributors, it includes features for that class of customers, namely matrix items, serialised inventory, bar coding, and quantity pricing. 

In what the company claimed to be a first for applications providers, the software integrates the UPS shipping API to ease the mailing of goods. Additionally, NetSuite 9.0 adds mail merge, streamlined activity tracking, advanced searching, and expanded report options. 

The sum of these new features, Nelson explained, is "SAP-like functionality at a mid-market price."

NetSuite 9.0 goes live on Friday for the company's customers.

Tom Sullivan writes for IDG News Service

 


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This was first published in September 2003

 

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