Metals firm migrates to Active Directory

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Metals firm migrates to Active Directory

Metals company Outokumpu has completed the design phase of a migration to Active Directory in Windows Server 2003. The firm will perform a pilot at its Finnish headquarters before rolling out to its six UK sites and 21,000 users in 40 countries.

The migration was prompted by the end of support for NT4, which forms the bulk of the company's operating environment. The migration will take place alongside a major hardware refresh to HP Proliant DL380 devices and a global SAP roll-out.

Because of a complex history of mergers and acquisitions within Outokumpu, the directory migration will involve NT4 users and the consolidation of various existing Active Directory implementations. The company is using migration tools from Aelita.

Senior systems analyst Chris Martin said cost savings would come from shifting from 100 existing NT/AD domains to just one directory structure. The firm also expects a reduction in support and administration costs.

He said the major motivation was the end of the life of NT, the benefits of a simplified infrastructure and the promise of a single sign-on for users.

"Because of the cost of support and the complexity of management, we are looking for simplification as well as being able to provide the advantages of a single sign-on, such as access to data while on the move." he said.

The tools from Aelita will allow Outokumpu to automate the migration of NT4 and AD users to a new, single worldwide AD structure.

The tools can be used remotely and enable the migration teams to gather information on users and devices in their existing locations and transfer them to the new directory structure.

The pilot is due to be completed in the early part of this month and the project will be completed by the end of 2004.

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This was first published in August 2003

 

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