Feature

Intel extends Landesk network management suite to mobiles

Intel has extended its Landesk 6 management suite to mobile devices with the addition of a module based on XcelleNet's Afaria, writes Eric Doyle.

Like Afaria, the Landesk Mobile Manager module allows network administrators to intelligently roll out software and data updates to a range of laptops, handheld devices and smartphones according to which operating system is in use. It also keeps a record of inventory details such as software and hardware assets, version numbers and each device's capabilities.

This not only allows software applications to be kept up-to-date but also enables the synchronisation of data so that remote workers, field personnel and salespeople can be given the latest information on products and pricing, for example, when they log in wirelessly or over a modem link.

Mark Whitehouse, Intel Landesk EMEA sales and marketing manager, said, "Mobile Manager is fully integrated with Landesk 6 so that it recognises whether the user is attached over the Lan or remotely. If the connection is made remotely, the system has a bandwidth throttle to ensure that large files are not sent across low-data rate connections."

Yad Jaura, XcelleNet's European marketing manager, said, "We have been working with Intel for some time, and the inventory system in Afaria was already based on Intel's product. At the moment we support most popular devices and we will extend this to other products according to demand."

Mobile Manager's operating system support extends to Microsoft Pocket PC, PalmOS, Symbian and some RIM Blackberry devices. The system should cost about £42 per seat and will be available from 10 September.

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This was first published in August 2002

 

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