Feature

Insurers tap claims archive to ease compliance burden

Audatex, which provides motor claims services to insurers such as Norwich Union and Royal & SunAlliance, has deployed archiving technology from EMC to give insurers improved access to closed cases.

Several firms are already using the system, which includes a full audit trail for files to help insurers comply with Financial Services Authority regulations and the Data Protection Act.

The technology, called Centera, is an integrated hardware and software storage system. It can store seven years’ worth of data, in line with insurers’ compliance obligations.

Audatex offers a hosted service that allows companies to track insurance claims from an initial damage assessment through to claims and repair tracking. Insurers’ call centre staff used the system to work on live claims but, until recently, once a case was closed it became the responsibility of the insurer to archive and manage the closed file in compliance with regulations.

Audatex’s new system means that insurers can pass that responsibility to the service provider.

“Before we had this solution, our previous approach was client-based,” said Ross McEleny, IT services director at Audatex. “We did not have the room on our storage area network to hold on to closed files for too long, so the buck was passed back to the insurer.

“With EMC Centera, they can retrieve an archived case within moments. It is a slower than the storage area network used for live files, but they can call a file back very quickly.”

Audatex has installed Centera in its two hosting centres, replicating archived data from its primary datacentre in London to a secondary site outside the capital. The back-up site would enable full archive access within a matter of hours should a disaster take out the main datacentre, said McEleny.


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This was first published in May 2006

 

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