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I want to get into Windows 2000

I currently work in datacentre operations and have two-and-a-half years' experience with Vax VMS/Sun Solaris/NT/Lan and Novell. I would like to get into Windows 2000 as I see a lot of opportunities there.

I was advised to do a NT upgrade to Windows 2000 course. I also thought that doing the MCSE course for NT Workstation and Server would be a good way of getting me a support role. Can you please give me your opinion and suggestions for courses?

The solution Use the Web to find courses

The need for network skills is going to be with us for some time, particularly the ability to network, based on PC technology. Over the next few years, businesses will certainly be making a greater demand on networks, both for voice and data, particularly with the continuing growth of e-commerce. The development of digital technologies and their impact on the domestic market is going to create an exponential demand for IT communications skills.

Your suggestion to do a MCSE for NT Workstation and Server is excellent. However, I would still consider looking at the Windows 2000 version, as by the time you complete the course it will be more widely used than it is at the moment.

You may also like to consider broader qualifications, such as those offered by the Open University and many colleges. These are not directly linked to specific operating systems. Additionally, the Cisco Academy, for example, offers a wide range of network-based qualifications and I am sure that with your background and aspirations you could find them beneficial.

For more information about courses I suggest you search the Web, as more and more organisations are listing their courses online.

  • Solution by Gordon Greaves, director, qualifications and standards, ITNTO

  • The panel: Apex, Best International Group, Computer Futures, Computer People, Elan, ITNTO, Monarch Recruitment


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    This was first published in June 2000

     

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