Application performance slowdowns result in lost business

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Application performance slowdowns result in lost business

A survey conducted in July by security systems giant Symantec has indicated that business application slowdowns affect business productivity, customer loyalty, and employee morale.

Common impacts of business application performance slowdowns include sluggish response to user commands, long delays in business transactions or processes, and slow loading web pages.

The survey revealed that 24% of IT staff time is devoted to addressing business application performance delays. In complex business application environments, delays can be caused by changes or updates required to keep pace with end user demand.

Additionally, the IT professionals polled in the survey also recognise that the performance and availability of these applications directly affect the customer experience. Of the IT managers polled, three quarters acknowledged that persistent delays would affect customer loyalty to their organisations.

'Application performance delays are not only costly to the top line but they also erode invaluable business assets such as customer satisfaction and brand loyalty,' asserts Henri Isenberg, vice president, server foundation and APM product group, of Symantec.

'Customers have high expectations for their business applications and expect them to perform quickly and consistently. These findings emphasise the need for proactive end-to-end performance management solutions.'

The findings of the study also indicate that application performance slowdowns affect employee productivity and morale. Of the business users polled, 86% stated that persistent delays would lower their morale; in addition, 93% of business user respondents noted that performance issues would affect their productivity.


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This was first published in September 2006

 

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