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Access "In-house vs. moving to the cloud: Data centre learning guide"

Published: 21 Jan 2013

When deciding between keeping IT infrastructure in-house or moving to the cloud, important questions are bound to surface about scalability, flexibility and security. This in-house versus moving to the cloud data centre guide explores the benefits and drawbacks of each approach across three factors: Cost: Moving IT infrastructure to the cloud helps avoid some capital investment such as designing, building and managing a data centre in-house. But a flawed contract with a cloud provider could lead to high operating expenses, experts warn. Security: Securing an in-house data centre can be expensive for smaller organisations. But, organisations with a robust in-house IT infrastructure will find it worthwhile to make this additional investment and retain the data centre because cloud security depends upon the infrastructure and the services they make available to clients. There is often little room to alter the cloud service-level agreements (SLAs). Performance, reliability and scalability: Moving to the cloud and using software, platform and infrastructure as a ... Access >>>

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