Firms struggle with e-mail storage

Almost 60% of businesses in the UK say they have had to take steps to reduce e-mail storage requirements, as they can’t keep up with the ever-increasing amount of electronic data being saved on corporate systems.

Almost 60% of businesses in the UK say they have had to take steps to reduce e-mail storage requirements, as they can’t keep up with the ever-increasing amount of electronic data being saved on corporate systems.
 
A survey of 150 IT staff was undertaken by data back-up firm Iron Mountain Digital, which found that over half of firms (56%) that have taken action have chosen to slash inbox size limits for employees.

In addition, nearly one-third (29%) have introduced data archiving policies, and 18% have limited the amount of personal data that can be held on corporate systems.
 
Iron Mountain also found that 55% of firms had experienced an e-mail outage in the past 12 months, putting valuable company information held in e-mail out of reach.
 
Whilst eight out of 10 firms said their systems were often back up and running within hours after an outage, almost one in five (18%) had to wait days or even weeks to get e-mail back on line.
 
Nick Cater, head of Northern Europe at Iron Mountain Digital, said, “Despite companies’ best efforts, employees will always prefer to store e-mails and attachments locally due to the ease of use and access.
 
“Companies must safeguard this data by ensuring it is properly protected so that in the event of data loss or e-mail systems going down, employees can still access relevant information and get on with their jobs.”

Related article: IBM improves data recovery process

Comment on this article: computer.weekly@rbi.co.uk

Read more on E-commerce technology

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCIO

SearchSecurity

SearchNetworking

SearchDataCenter

SearchDataManagement

Close