Long hours cause career damage



Senior IT people are working an average of 54 hours a week - and one of the first things to suffer as a result is their own career development.

This...



Senior IT people are working an average of 54 hours a week - and one of the first things to suffer as a result is their own career development.

This emerges from a survey of 300 IT managers by recruitment consultancy Harvey Nash, which also shows that many are putting in 80 hours a week.

Working long hours means people have no time to find new jobs with shorter hours: 90% spend less than 30 minutes a week thinking about their next career move, yet 54% say they would have got a better job had they devoted more time to managing their last move.

These findings mean IT managers are poorly placed to take advantage of an IT management jobs market which is taking off, says Harvey Nash director Tony Willis.

"There is now an extremely buoyant jobs market for senior IT professionals, but surprisingly few are investing enough time in planning their long-term career progression," he says

"The higher an executive climbs up the ladder, the less time he or she has for personal career management."

Employers were warned earlier this year by the Industrial Society that balancing home and work life is emerging as crucial to retention and productivity.

And research by Manchester University found that staff who feel coerced into working long hours suffer from increased stress and physical problems and are negative about their employer.

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