EU security body says firms should be forced to disclose security breaches

A European Union security body wants to force firms to disclose security breaches, as part of the EU's efforts to avoid a "digital 9/11".

Enisa, the...

A European Union security body wants to force firms to disclose security breaches, as part of the EU's efforts to avoid a "digital 9/11".

Enisa, the EU Agency for European Network and Information Security, has highlighted key online security issues in Europe in a report.

The agency underlined EU member states' imbalances in addressing security threats at a briefing in Brussels.

Enisa concluded that member states have a long way to go in safeguarding the e-economy. "Europe should not wait for a 'digital 9/11', but instead should reduce imbalances in national security approaches", it said.

Executive director of Enisa, Andrea, Pirotti said, "Europe must take security threats more seriously and invest more resources in NIS (network and information security).

"Therefore, Enisa calls for the EU to introduce mandatory reporting on security breaches and incidents for business, just as the US has already done."

"The member states should undertake concerted efforts to reduce the imbalances in security levels, with more cross-border cooperation. Enisa is confident that the need for secure networks to safeguard the European economy is a distinct driving force for member states to cooperate more closely," he said.




Read more on IT risk management

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCIO

SearchSecurity

SearchNetworking

SearchDataCenter

SearchDataManagement

Close