Infosec 2009: Cybersecurity needs partnership between government and business

Cybersecurity is not the responsibility of government, business or individuals, but can be achieved only through a partnership of these, attendees of Infosec...

Cybersecurity is not the responsibility of government, business or individuals, but can be achieved only through a partnership of these, attendees of Infosec Europe heard in London today.

There is little agreement in the UK about who should do and pay for what to improve online security but there is agreement that the answer lies in some kind of partnership, said PhilipVirgo, Eurim secretary general.

This partnership will require understanding, commitment, and resources, he said, which was echoed by detective superintendent Charlie McMurdie, who heads the investigative arm of the Police Central E-Crime Unit (PCeU).

The PceU's mission statement is to increase the capacity of law enforcement to deal with e-crime, and the most important objective now is to co-ordinate all those efforts across the UK, she said in a debate on who should police the internet.

Our aim is to establish standard processes, structures and training across all 43 police forces so we can harness all the work they are doing and avoid duplication of effort, she said.

The PceU is a key part of the UK effort to combat e-crime and has already take part in a succesful cybercrime operation in its first six months of existence.

This success, said McMurdie, was possible through a new approach to cybercrime, which involves tapping into the intelligence and resources of an industry sector under attack.

Working with the financial sector, the police were able to get real-time intelligence on attacks across several organisations and act quickly to make arrests in six weeks, that otherwise would have taken a year to investigate and gather the necessary intelligence, she said.

Building on this success, said McMurdie, the police plan to form a similar partnership with the retail sector, where many different organisations will be able to contribute real time intelligence on similar sort of attacks to help track those responsible.

UK law enforcement also plans to develop other partnerships into the future, particularly those with Interpol, Europol, and security and fraud monitoring organisations.

According to McMurdie, it is only through this connected, real-time intelligence approach that law enforcement authorities can begin to make significant and demonstrable progress against cybercrime.

Read more on IT for government and public sector

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCIO

SearchSecurity

SearchNetworking

SearchDataCenter

SearchDataManagement

Close