VMWare develops operating system for the cloud

VMWare has introduced what it claims is the world's first cloud computing operating system. Based on its virtualisation technology, the operating system, known as vSphere 40, targets IT departments with a flexible IT infrastructure to run applications in-house or via an external hosting provider.

VMWare has introduced what it claims is the world's first cloud computing operating system. Based on its virtualisation technology, the operating system, known as vSphere 40, targets IT departments with a flexible IT infrastructure to run applications in-house or via an external hosting provider.

Paul Maritz, president and chief executive officer at VMware, said: "VMware vSphere is the next evolution along this path of innovation. By giving IT organisations a non-disruptive path to cloud computing, we will be leading our customers on a journey that delivers value every step of the way, delivering up to an additional 30% cost reduction today while enabling IT to deliver reliable and adaptable IT services."

VMWare's strategy is to target end-user IT departments that want to reap the benefits of low-cost computing. It argues that users do not have to dump their existing infrastructure and switch public services from Google, Microsoft or Amazon.

Instead vSphere offers CIOs a virtualisation platform that separates applications from physical server hardware, network and storage infrastructure. It allows users to run applications in-house as an internal cloud service, or externally from a cloud computing provider. Virtualisations can be moved between internal and external clouds.

Pricing starts at $166 per processor.

Existing VMware Infrastructure 3 users with valid support and subscription contracts are automatically entitled to VMware vSphere 4 editions.

VMWare vSphere 24.0 performance boost 
 ­2x the number of virtual processors per virtual machine (from 4 to 8)
 ­2.5x more virtual NICs per virtual machine (from 4 to 10)
 ­4x more memory per virtual machine (from 64 GB to 255GB)
 ­3x increase in network throughput
 ­2x increase in the maximum recorded I/O operations per second (to over 200,000)
 ­New maximum recorded number of transactions per second - 8,900 which is 5x the total payment traffic of the VISA network worldwide
Targeted performance improvements for specific applications
­Estimated 50 % improved performance for application development workloads

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