Government proposes widespread access to children's database

All police officers and police civilian staff will have access to the controversial ContactPoint children's database.

All police officers and police civilian staff will have access to the controversial ContactPoint children's database. There will also be widespread access to the personal information on every English child amongst school staff too, said the government.

Children's minister Beverley Hughes has released a list of job positions to which an English local authority will provide access to the system.

As well as all police officers and staff covering a specific geographic area, the system will be available to health care professionals and their assistants officers of local probation boards and youth offending teams heads, officers and administrators at prisons and secure training centres and all social care workers.

In addition, ContactPoint will also be available to school headteachers, deputy heads, heads of year, other teachers with pastoral or child protection responsibilities, special needs teachers and co-ordinators, and those working in similar posts at further and higher education establishments.

The widespread access also extends to charities including Barnardo's and the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Even fire and rescue authority employees working on strategies for children and young people will have access.

The list was released after a parliamentary question was tabled by Keith Vaz MP, the Labour chair of the home affairs select committee.

Before the list was revealed, privacy campaigners had already expressed concern about the security of the database.

The Conservative opposition says it will scrap the database.

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