Abbey completes Partenon core project

Abbey has completed a project to replace 30-year-old legacy systems with Banco Satander's global banking platform three years after Banco Santander's £8bn acquistion of Abbey.

Abbey has completed a project to replace 30-year-old legacy systems with Banco Satander's global banking platform three years after Banco Santander's £8bn acquistion of Abbey.

The integration project, which is now complete except for a few some small projects on the periphery, provides the bank with a single view of its customers for the first time.

The bank has moved its 10 million savings accounts, four million current accounts and eight million card accounts to the new platform.

The bank has renewed its branch communications network by building more than 45 portals for 26,000 employees and third-party organisations, and has also created a back-up datacentre.

It has moved its payment systems to Partenon and integrated its back-office processing engines with the global Partenon infrastructure

The system uses in-house middleware called Banksphere and is built on an IBM database platform.

The project moves the bank from having separate systems supporting different parts of the business to a single platform that can collate all the data about each customer. "In doing so we have straight-through processing, much better sales tools and improved administration," said the bank.

Making all customer information available in one place is a key long-term goal for banks as It allows them to save money and time and improve customer service. It gives bank staff better information when making decisions about providing financial products.

When Banco Santander bought Abbey, it saw Partenon as a key element in its plans to reduce costs at the bank by £300m

Chris skinner, CEO at financial services think tank Balatro, said the Partenon platform will transform the bank's IT infrastructure from that of a domestic player to an international one. "This gives Abbey the scope to add some of the functionality that you might see in an internationally focused bank

"It is more likely to mean that they can gain the economies of scale from the global platform and build in more functionality. It will be able to offer web banking services similar to international banks, which a domestic bank would not," he said.




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