Jülich Research Centre buys world’s second-fastest supercomputer

Germany’s Jülich Research Centre will take delivery in autumn of the world’s second-fastest supercomputer, a 65,000 processor, 220 teraflops IBM Blue Gene/P.

Germany’s Jülich Research Centre will take delivery in autumn of the world’s second-fastest supercomputer, a 65,000 processor, 220 teraflops IBM Blue Gene/P.

The machine, which uses about a tenth of the energy used by equivalent supercomputers, will join two other supercomputers, the 46-teraflop Jülich Blue Gene/L, and the nine-teraflop Jülich Multi Processor, to make Jülich Europe’s most powerful supercomputer site and number two in the world.

The computers are available to some 200 research groups in Europe to run simulations and compute models for communications networks, materials science and particle physics to medicine and environmental research.

The order, signed this week, is part of a strategy to get Europe into the petaflop era by 2009.

IBM tops supercomputer rankings >>

Research Centre Julich >>

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