Legacy code is promised a longer life

A UK company has developed software designed to extend the life of legacy products by building a model of how they are used.

A UK company has developed software designed to extend the life of legacy products by building a model of how they are used.

The Erudine Behaviour Engine can build up representation of the business logic held within legacy applications. In many businesses, such information has been long lost. The software is designed to look at how end-users interact with the legacy code it also examines the screen output in response to user input, all without having to access the application source code.

In doing so, Erudine says its Behaviour Engine generates business rules for the legacy code.

The engine can then test these rules with a series of cases presented to expert users - their behaviour can fine tune the rules and highlights any conflicts. Legacy applications often require new code to comply with legislative changes or new business contexts.

It can also help build applications from scratch more efficiently, the supplier said. Although it still needs basic user requirements, the system can carry out business tasks, detailed design and some coding using case-based knowledge capture.

Roy Illsley, senior research analyst at Butler Group, said, "This looks like a good way of prolonging the live of legacy applications. It sounds extremely good, but I am sceptical that it is as easy and fast as they say. We will need to wait five years or so until it is more widely used."

Further information:

www.erudine.com

 


Comment on this article: computer.weekly@rbi.co.uk

 

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