Vista: Microsoft’s ‘most secure’ operating system

Microsoft has claimed its newly available Windows Vista will be the most secure operating system it has released.

Microsoft has claimed its newly available Windows Vista will be the most secure operating system it has released.

The company insisted it has listened to feedback from users, who disagreed with its decision to turn off some security features by default in Windows XP, and it has now traded application compatibility for security.

Vista’s security features include the ability for system administrators to stop PCs allowing USB (Universal Serial Bus) drives or other peripherals to be connected within corporate networks, while Vista and Internet Explorer will warn users when a website attempts to install dangerous code.

Meanwhile an anti-phishing site, updated hourly, will also warn users of e-mail messages that attempt to trick them into giving up their personal information, and Enterprise and Ultimate versions of Vista will allow users to encrypt hard drives in an attempt to address continuing problems with data breaches caused by lost laptops.

I hope Microsoft’s confidence in its new operating system is justified. Sometimes the feeling remains that some of these security measures are still bolt-on gimmicks, rather than hardened, built-in security to thwart hackers – though the ability to disable USB drives will have many systems administrators cheering from their desktops.

Read David Lacey’s security blog

Read Stuart King’s risk management blog

Comment on this article: computer.weekly@rbi.co.uk


 

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