Sun launches ‘world’s fastest’ blade server

Sun Microsystems has launched what it claims is the world’s fastest blade server, in addition to the first subscription service that enables blade customers to keep their datacentres at peak performance and efficiency at half the cost of traditional acquisition methods.

Sun Microsystems has launched what it claims is the world’s fastest blade server, in addition to the first subscription service that enables blade customers to keep their datacentres at peak performance and efficiency at half the cost of traditional acquisition methods.

The hardware giant boasts that the new systems post three performance world records, and set a new standard for four-socket servers, especially when combined with the Solaris 10 operating system (OS).
 
Sun describes its new lines as the only blade systems designed specifically to run resource-intensive enterprise business and technical applications. In addition it says the Sun Blade 8000 modular systems are the first blade servers available to support the highest-performing AMD Opteron processors.
 
"Today's datacentres are looking for ways to save operating expenses, but they also need to stay up to speed with the latest and greatest technology to deliver the highest performance levels… so we decided to create a powerful service to help customers with this dilemma," says Lisa Sieker, vice-president of marketing for Sun's Systems Group.

The Sun Refresh Service is designed to allow customers to reap maximum performance and efficiency from their datacentres on an ongoing basis. The subscription service programme includes installation of the Sun Blade 8000 modular system with server modules, plus three refreshes of server modules over a 42-month period.

Customers receive automatic upgrades to the latest blade architecture as soon as it becomes available. With each refresh, Sun will deliver and install new server modules and pick up the old server modules.

This announcement symbolises the new paradigm for hardware sales, in particular datacentre solutions. In days of old, suppliers like Sun just trotted out a whole host of performance stats and specs.

The company has realised that end-users are more interested in what effect the technology has on the business and how the technology can bring about ROI and benefits in operational performance, especially savings on power and cooling costs as well as that spent on software licences.

Comment on this article: computer.weekly@rbi.co.uk

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