SAP allows workers' council after legal threat

SAP is to allow the establishment of a workers’ council at the company after a number of staff took their case to the German courts.

SAP is to allow the establishment of a workers’ council at the company after a number of staff took their case to the German courts.

SAP, which has 10,000 staff at its Walldorf headquarters alone, is one of biggest companies in Germany not to have a workers’ council.

A workers’ council involves trade union representatives and management, and requires that a company must open up the books to representatives, and inform staff of important corporate decisions in a timely manner.

SAP claimed the company did not need such a body, as it settled staff disagreements without the need for formal structures. It also says the majority of staff do not want a workers’ council.

Staff members however took their case for a workers’ council to the courts, and SAP has now agreed to set one up by holding elections for around 40 representatives.

SAP is now encouraging staff to elect a slate of representatives that have the same corporate view as the company management.

 

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